260 Unknown Facts About Africa


Africa Safari

260 Interesting Facts About Africa

  • There are 54 countries in Africa.
  • Camels eating flowers in the Sahara Desert.
  • Happy camels when the Sahara Desert is lush with flowers.
  • Al’Aziziyah in Libya is the hottest place recorded in the world.
  • 100 million Africans have Facebook accounts.
  • The Fish River Canyon in Namibia is the second largest canyon in the world.
  • Lake Malawi has the largest number of fish species in the world – 
  • There are about 2300 bird species in Africa.
  • Three thousand kids a day die from malaria – mostly in sub Saharan Africa.
  • Africa’s most commonly spoken language is Arabic. English is second. 
  • Camels eating flowers in the Sahara Desert
  • Happy camels when the Sahara Desert is lush with flowers
  • The Fish River Canyon in Namibia is the second largest canyon in the world.
  • Lake Malawi has the largest number of fish species in the world – 
  • There are about 2300 bird species in Africa.
  • Three thousand kids a day die from malaria – mostly in sub Saharan Africa.
  • It’s also home to the tallest animal in the world – the giraffe.
  • As well as the fastest animal in the world – the cheetah.
  • The Big Five (lion, rhinoceros, elephant, leopard, and Cape buffalo) can be found in many places in Africa. 
  • One of the largest nature reserves in the world is found in South Africa – The Kruger National Park.
  • Ethiopia has its own alphabet. It’s the only country in Africa to have its very own. 
  • Sudan has more pyramids than Egypt (200+ pyramids). But the largest pyramid is actually found in Mexico!
  • The world’s largest frog lives in Cameroon. It’s named the Goliath Frog and it can grow to be more than 13 inches long. 
  • Africa is home to 25% of the world’s bird species. There are over 2500 kinds of birds found throughout its countries.
  • It’s also the world’s oldest populated continent. 
  • Africa holds the name of being the biggest oil producer in the world.
  • Population: 1,415,045,928.
  • Land area: 30,370,000 km2 (11,730,000 square miles).
  • Most spoken languages: Arabic, English, Swahili, Amharic, Yoruba, Oromo, Hausa, Igbo and Zulu.
  • Religion: Islam and Christianity are the two most common religions.
  • Time zones: From UTC-1 to UTC+4.
  • The highest mountain on the continent is Mount Kilimanjaro.
  • Africa’s largest island is Madagascar.
  • The smallest country in Africa is the Seychelles, which is also an island. 
  • The largest African country is Algeria.
  • Chad has the second fastest growing economy in the world.
  • Unfortunately the top 10 poorest countries in the world are all in Africa.
  • Mogadishu, Somalia is the fourth most dangerous city in the world. Johannesburg, South Africa is 10th. (For comparison’s sake Washington, DC is the 5th most dangerous city in the world!!!)
  • Libreville, Gabon is the 5th most expensive city in the world to live in. Tokyo is the most expensive city.
  • The Nile is the longest river in the world – the 6,670 kms takes you through Tanzania, Uganda, Sudan and Egypt.
  • Six of the driest places in the world are in Africa – Al’Kufrah, Libya, Aswan and Luxor in Egypt, Wadi Halfa in Sudan, Pelican Point in Namibia and Aoelef in Algeria.
  • One of the driest places in the world  – Valley of the Kings near Luxor – Photo credit: Jeremy Zero on Unsplash
  • The hottest place in the world is recorded at Al’Aziziyah in Libya.
  • Eritrea, Egypt and Libya are in the number 1,2 and 3 spots respectively for the world’s most dangerous roads. And I thought Kenya was bad.
  • South Africa has the highest number (5.3 million) of people living with HIV/Aids in the world. Compare that to Canada with 56,000 and Croatia with only 200.
  • Angola has the world’s highest infant mortality rate at 192.5 deaths per 1000 live births.
  • Shipwreck Point in Liberia is a mecca for globe trotting surfers. They come for the 10 metre waves between March and October
  • About half of the world’s diamonds come from southern and central Africa. The largest gem quality diamond ever found (the 3106.75 carat Cullinan Diamond) came from the Premier Mine near Pretoria. It was found in 1905.
  • Three of the world’s largest gold producers have their primary operations in Africa – Harmony Gold, Gold Fields and Anglogold Ashanti.
  • Eighteen people from Africa have been awarded a Nobel prize. They come from Algeria, Egypt, Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria and South Africa.
  • Almost 100 species of lemurs are found in Madagascar.
  • African elephants are the largest living land animals. They can weigh up to 6-7 tons and drink over 160 litres of water a day.
  • The world’s biggest frog comes from Cameroon. It is over one foot long.
  • Four of the five fastest land animals live in Africa. The cheetah is the fastest and can run at 60 mph.
  • The Sahara Desert is expanding in the south at a rate of about half a mile a month.
  • Each year, in the dry season (around July), a gigantic herd made up of millions of wildebeest migrates from Tanzania to Kenya, crossing the treacherous Mara River along the way. The Great Wildebeest Migration is a magnificent sight, and many come on safari just to see it. 
  • Mount Kilimanjaro is Africa’s highest peak, but it’s also the tallest free-standing mountain in the world. The dormant volcano is not part of a mountain range and stands on its own. 
  • 90% of the world’s malaria cases originate in Africa. Thankfully this is only a problem in certain areas, and there are plenty of safe African countries to visit.
  • Africa is a vast continent, with 54 countries. Although some confuse the entire continent with being a single country. 
  • It’s the second-largest continent in the world. The largest being Asia, of course.
  • The CAT Scan was first done in South Africa, as was the very first heart transplant.
  • Africa’s deforestation rates are double those of the rest of the world.
  • 18 million slaves were captured from Africa and taken overseas in the 7th – 20th century.
  • During the 16th to 19th centuries, Europeans were enslaved by Barbary pirates and sold to Northern Africans. This was known as the Barbary Slave Trade. 
  • The famous singer Freddie Mercury was born in Zanzibar, a group of islands just off the coast of Tanzania. 
  • Anyone living in Egypt that has a social media following of more than 5000 will be subject to monitoring by the government. This is to stop the spreading of fake news. 
  • Despotic Ugandan dictator, Idi Amin, had a slightly longer official title. It was: “His Excellency, President for Life, Field Marshal Al Hadji Doctor Idi Amin Dada, VC, DSO, MC, Lord of All the Beasts of the Earth and Fishes of the Seas and Conqueror of the British Empire in Africa in General and Uganda in Particular”.
  • Unfortunately the top 10 poorest countries in the world are all in Africa.
  • Mogadishu, Somalia is the fourth most dangerous city in the world. Johannesburg, South Africa is 10th. (For comparison’s sake Washington, DC is the 5th most dangerous city in the world!!!)
  • Libreville, Gabon is the 5th most expensive city in the world to live in. Tokyo is the most expensive city.
  • The Nile is the longest river in the world – the 6,670 kms takes you through Tanzania, Uganda, Sudan and Egypt.
  • Six of the driest places in the world are in Africa – Al’Kufrah, Libya, Aswan and Luxor in Egypt, Wadi Halfa in Sudan, Pelican Point in Namibia and Aoelef in Algeria.
  • Niger, Mali and Uganda take the #1,2 and 3 spots for the highest birth rates in the world.
  • In the Gulf of Tadjourah in Djibouti you can swim from November to January with massive whale sharks who come to feed on plankton during their annual migration.
  • etween 1990 and 1999 PPP GNI per capita growth was 15% ($1,176.3 to $1,357.2) for Sub-Saharan Africa; and between 2000 and 2010 it was 63% ($1,403.4 to $2,288.7).
  • SSA experienced an increase in both exports and imports. Exports increased from $300 billion in 2009 to $375 billion in 2010, a 25% increase; while imports increased from $330 billion in 2008 to $379 billion in 2010, a 15% increase.
  • In 21% of Sub-Saharan African countries, one or two products accounts for at least 75% of total exports.
  • The largest recipient of net official development assistance (ODA) in Sub-Saharan Africa received an amount 72 times larger than the smallest recipient. The largest recipient is Democratic Republic of Congo (US $3,543 million), and the smallest is São Tomé and Príncipe (US $49 million).
  • In 3 countries by rank, Sierra Leone, Ethiopia and Togo, the agriculture value-added as percentage of GDP was over forty percent (49%, 48%, and 43%, respectively); in South Africa it is lowest at 2.5%.
  • In 2009, South Africa utilizes the most electric power per person (4,532kW/h); Ethiopia utilizes the least (45 kW/h).
  • 27 countries have their female participation rates higher than the SSA average (64.3 percent). Burundi, Malawi, Mozambique and Rwanda have higher female participation rates than male. Mauritania and Sudan have the lowest women participation rates (29 and 32 respectively). 
  • In 2009, HIV/AIDS caused the death of 310,000 adults and children in South Africa, and less than 1,000 in Comoros, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Mauritania, and Mauritius respectively.
  • Flows of international development assistance to Sub-Saharan African countries to fight HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases increased by 14.5% from 2009 to 2010; US $3,887.6 in 2009 to US $ 4,450 in 2010.
  • In the decade (2000-2010) Liberia and Rwanda have made the greatest gains in life expectancy: 10 and 9 years respectively. Conversely, life expectancy has decreased in 3 countries namely, South Africa (3 years), Swaziland (0.3 years) and Lesotho (0.2 years).
  • The highest connection charge for a business phone is $355 in Benin; the lowest is in Mozambique at $14. Benin had the highest connection charge ($195) for a residential phone.
  • For fixed broadband Internet, the highest connection charge is $2,371.7 in Guinea; the lowest is in Madagascar and Nigeria.
  • The countries with the highest and lowest number of mobile phones per 1,000 people in Sub-Saharan Africa were Seychelles with 1359 mobile phones per 1,000 people and Eritrea 35 per 1,000 people, respectively.
  • For the period 2000-09, the ratio of paved roads to total roads was the highest in Mauritius (98%); and lowest in Chad (less than 1%).
  • In 2011, to start a business required 160 days for each procedure in Congo, Republic; it took three days in Rwanda. In Guinea-Bissau the number of days reduced from 216 in 2010 to 9 in 2011.
  • In 2011, Guinea-Bissau had the highest number of procedures to enforce contracts (1,715); Rwanda had the lowest at 230.
  • It takes 18 days average time to clear customs on direct exports in Democratic Republic of Congo and 6.2 days in Botswana; conversely for imports it takes 45.4 days in Democratic Republic of Congo and 3.7 days in Botswana.
  • For the period 2000-10, skilled personnel attended 6% of births in Ethiopia; they attended 99% of births in Mauritius.
  • Only 3 countries (Mauritius 60, Sao Tome and Principe 70 and Cape Verde 79), have maternal mortality rates (modeled) less than 100 per 100,000 live births. Conversely, Chad has the highest rate at 1,100 per 100,000 live births.
  • Contraceptive use (any method) is highest in Mauritius at 76%; lowest is Chad at 5% for the period 2000-10.
  • For the period 2000-10, in Mali and Rwanda, 70% of children under age 5 slept under insecticide-treated nets to prevent malaria; they were 1% in Equatorial Guinea and Swaziland.
  • Only 23% of the rural population of Sub-Saharan Africa has access to improved sanitation compared to 42% of the urban population.
  • Seychelles had the highest percentage of forest area with 89%, whilst Mauritania had the lowest at less than 0.2%.
  • SSA GDP growth was 5%. Chad, Liberia, Ethiopia and Zimbabwe had the largest growth at 13%, 10.3%, 9.9% and 9% respectively by rank. Twenty-six of the 48 SSA countries had a growth of over 5% for the same period.
  • South Africa has SSA’s largest real GDP ($187 billion); the smallest is Guinea Bissau ($244 million).
  • The Gross National Income (GNI) per capita of the richest Sub-Saharan African country (Equatorial Guinea) is 76 times larger than the GNI per capita of the poorest (Democratic Republic of Congo.).
  • Shipwreck Point in Liberia is a mecca for globe trotting surfers. They come for the 10 metre waves between March and October
  • About half of the world’s diamonds come from southern and central Africa. The largest gem quality diamond ever found (the 3106.75 carat Cullinan Diamond) came from the Premier Mine near Pretoria. It was found in 1905.
  • Three of the world’s largest gold producers have their primary operations in Africa – Harmony Gold, Gold Fields and Anglogold Ashanti.
  • Eighteen people from Africa have been awarded a Nobel prize. They come from Algeria, Egypt, Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria and South Africa.
  • Almost 100 species of lemurs are found in Madagascar.
  • African elephants are the largest living land animals. They can weigh up to 6-7 tons and drink over 160 litres of water a day.
  • The world’s biggest frog comes from Cameroon. It is over one foot long.
  • Four of the five fastest land animals live in Africa. The cheetah is the fastest and can run at 60 mph.
  • Algeria is the largest country by area with 2,381,741 square kilometres. It’s the 10th largest country in the world.
  • Lake Victoria is the largest lake in Africa and the world’s second largest fresh water lake. It borders Tanzania, Kenya and Uganda. There are over 1,000 islands in the lake – some tiny and some that are inhabited. The average depth of the lake is just 25 metres and at it’s deepest its just 82 metres! 
  • The northern most point in Africa is Ras ben Sakka in Tunisia. The most southerly point is Cape Agulhas in South Africa.
  • Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania is the highest point in Africa and the tallest free-standing mountain in the world. It tops out at 19,340 feet (5,895 metres) above sea level. The snow caps are melting, with more than 80 percent of their mass gone since 1912.Sometime in the next 20 years the mountain mat be completely ice-free.
  • Plastic packaging and non-biodegradable polythene bags are 100% banned in Rwanda. They’re not allowed in the country at all and all luggage is searched at the airport to make sure of this. 
  • There are more than 3000 recognized ethnic tribes in Africa. Some of these are well-known, like the Zulu. While others keep to themselves and avoid contact with the modern world completely. 
  • The Kalenjins are a Kenyan tribe, and from them, we have seen many of the world’s fastest runners. These include Wilson Kipsang and Dennis Kimetto.
  • French is spoken by more people in Africa than in France. And Portuguese is spoken by a larger number of people in Africa than in Portugal. 
  • Luanda, Angola is often referred to as the ‘Paris of Africa’. This comes from the city’s sophisticated atmosphere. 
  • In fact, Miss Universe 2011 was Leila Lopes, an Angolan beauty queen. 
  • All selling of second-hand underwear in Ghana was banned in 2010, and Zimbabwe followed suit in 2012. 
  • The only African countries that weren’t colonized by Europeans were Ethiopia and Liberia.
  • The Western Cape of South Africa is home to the longest wine route in the world. Route 62 spans 850kms and boasts some superb wineries. 
  • The author of the well-loved Lord of The Rings books, J.R.R Tolkien was a South African-born author from Bloemfontein, Free State. 
  • Johannesburg is also known as ‘The City of Gold’. This is because it was largely established when gold was discovered in the surrounding areas, and it became a mining town. 
  • Ghana is the world’s second-largest producer of cocoa. 
  • Nigeria’s movie industry, Nollywood, is technically bigger than Hollywood.
  • The 365-day calendar is believed to have been invented by the Egyptians. This helped them predict the annual Nile flooding. 
  • It’s considered rude to decline an offering of meat at meals in Morocco – vegetarians may have a hard time with this. 
  • The literacy rate among youth (15-24) in Gambia went up by 19% in 10 years, from 52.6% in 2000 to 65.5% in 2010.
  • Infant mortality declined in almost all countries during 1990-2010. The largest decline was in Madagascar and Malawi, by 56%.
  • The average number of children per woman in Sub- Saharan Africa decreased from 6 in 1990 to 5 in 2010. Seven (7) countries (Burundi, Cape Verde, Ethiopia, Namibia, Swaziland, and Togo) had the average number per women decline by 2.
  • The primary school completion rate for ten Sub- Saharan countries (Burkina Faso, Chad, Cape Verde, Guinea, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritania, Mozambique, Niger, and Togo) more than doubled between 1990 and 2010.
  • The lowest net primary enrolment ratio is found in Eritrea (34%); the highest is in Rwanda (99%).
  • In 2009 youth literacy (ages 15-24) is highest in Zimbabwe at 99% and lowest in Chad at 46%.
  • Rwanda has the highest number of women in national parliament with 56% of total seats. Comoros has the lowest with 3%.
  • In Sierra Leone 114 out of 1,000 children die before the age of one; in Seychelles the rate is 12 per 1,000.
  • The Dung Beetle is a beetle that rolls around large balls of dung.
  • Zambia has termite hills that get as large as houses.
  • The Sahara desert is currently larger than the entire United States. And it continues to grow each year!
  • Africa’s deadliest animal is the hippopotamus. This is because it has caused the most human deaths. 
  • In Morocco, instead of the heart being considered a symbol of love, it’s the liver. If someone states “You have conquered my liver” then, it’s a match made in, well, Morocco. 
  • The movie Blood Diamond, starring Leonardo DiCaprio, had many of its most dramatic scenes shot in Maputo, Mozambique. 
  • Mauritius was once home to the dodo – an extinct bird that inspired Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland. 
  • There are more people with internet connection in New York than there are in the whole of Africa.
  • Nearly 40% of the African population is illiterate. Women make up two-thirds of this statistic. 
  • The Second Congo War was the second-deadliest war in history (the first being World War 2).
  • Algeria is the largest country by area with 2,381,741 square kilometres. It’s the 10th largest country in the world.
  • Lake Victoria is the largest lake in Africa and the world’s second largest fresh water lake. It borders Tanzania, Kenya and Uganda. There are over 1,000 islands in the lake – some tiny and some that are inhabited. The average depth of the lake is just 25 metres and at it’s deepest its just 82 metres! 
  • The northern most point in Africa is Ras ben Sakka in Tunisia. The most southerly point is Cape Agulhas in South Africa.
  • Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania is the highest point in Africa and the tallest free-standing mountain in the world. It tops out at 19,340 feet (5,895 metres) above sea level. The snow caps are melting, with more than 80 percent of their mass gone since 1912.Sometime in the next 20 years the mountain mat be completely ice-free.
  • There’s an African beer brewed from bananas. This is widely made in East Africa and goes by various names in different countries.
  • Senegal has a pink lake called Lac Rose. The pink color is caused by a type of bacteria, but the lake is completely safe to swim in.
  • There’s a bar built into a 6000-year-old baobab tree, located in South Africa. You can visit to enjoy a drink all through the year. 
  • In rural markets in the province of Limpopo, Mopane worms can be found being sold as food. These are high in protein and the locals love them as a smoky snack. 
  • In Cape Town, there is a large nuclear power station built on a fault line. The last tremor was felt in 1809 and measured 6.5 on the Richter Scale. Scientists aren’t sure when the next one will happen.
  • Both Nelson Mandela and Desmond Tutu were influential South Africans who were awarded the Nobel Prize. They also happened to live on the same street at one time. 
  • The gemstone Tanzanite is only found in Tanzania. It was discovered in the 1800s by a Masai warrior and today it’s seen as one of the most precious gems in the world. 
  • Four of the five fastest land animals can be found in East Africa. These are the lion, the gazelle, the wildebeest, and the cheetah.
  • Men and women across East and Central Africa are often seen wearing brightly patterned cloths called Kanga. 
  • Africa is home to the largest land animal in the world – the African elephant.
  • In Rwanda, you can go gorilla tracking. Tourists are taken into the mountains and shown gorillas in their natural habitat. This raises money for the protection of these animals. 
  • Currently, there are two female presidents in Africa.  
  • The cold currents on South Africa’s west coast make it the ideal home to the African Penguin.
  • 90% of all platinum metals are mined Africa, and over 40% of the world’s gold comes from here. The continent is rich in natural resources, and this is how many countries make their money. 
  • South Africa has more than 200,000 windmills. Which is much more than the 10,000 recorded in the Netherlands, although the Dutch windmills are more popular.
  • Moroccans consider white to be the color of mourning. A widow will wear all white for 40 days after her husband passes away. 
  • Star Wars fans can visit and stay at some of the movies’ set in Southern Tunisia. 
  • Namibia is made up of a lot of desert land, and the Sossusvlei Sand Dunes rank in the top for the highest in the world. Sandboarding is a lot of fun in this country! 
  • It’s home to over 1 billion people – half of which are younger than 25.
  • More than 1500 languages are spoken across the continent. 
  • The longest river in the world, the Nile, is located in Egypt, Africa. 
  • The world’s largest desert (Sahara) is also situated in Africa. 
  • Africa is the world’s hottest continent, with a town in Ethiopia seeing average temperatures of 33.9 °C throughout the year.
  • The continent contains 30% of the planet’s mineral resources.
  • Africa is known to be the origin of civilization and written language.
  • 90% of the soil is not suitable for farming, however, a large portion of the African economy relies heavily on agriculture. 
  • Africa emits only 4% of total carbon dioxide emissions, which is impressive for such a large continent. 
  • There are a total of 3000 protected areas in Africa. These keep the fauna and flora safe and living naturally in their habitats. 
  • One of the oldest universities in the world is found in Timbuktu in Mali.
  • The richest country in Africa is Equatorial Guinea while the poorest is Zimbabwe.
  • One of the oldest universities in the world is in Timbuktu, Mali. By the 12th century Timbuktu was home to three universities. Over 25,000 students attended one of the Timbuktu universities in the 12th century.
  • Nigeria is the most populated country in Africa with over 195 million people as of 2020. It is the 7th most populated country in the world. The majority of the population is either Muslim or Christian. Within the country are an astounding 520spoken languages.
  • Equatorial Guinea is the richest country in Africa. The GDP per capita is $30,200. Botswana is second with a GDP of $15,800. Coming in last is Zimbabwe at $200 per year.
  • The hottest place in the world is recorded at Al’Aziziyah in Libya.
  • Eritrea, Egypt and Libya are in the number 1,2 and 3 spots respectively for the world’s most dangerous roads. And I thought Kenya was bad.
  • South Africa has the highest number (5.3 million) of people living with HIV/Aids in the world. Compare that to Canada with 56,000 and Croatia with only 200.
  • Angola has the world’s highest infant mortality rate at 192.5 deaths per 1000 live births.
  • Niger, Mali and Uganda take the #1,2 and 3 spots for the highest birth rates in the world.
  • In the Gulf of Tadjourah in Djibouti you can swim from November to January with massive whale sharks who come to feed on plankton during their annual migration.
  • The Sahara Desert is expanding in the south at a rate of about half a mile a month.
  • Nigeria has the largest population in Sub-Saharan Africa (158.4 million people) and accounts for 19% of the continent’s total population.
  • South Africa’s and Nigeria’s GDP in nominal prices comprised about 50% of total SSA’s GDP.
  • The total GDP per capita of the richest 10 African countries was 22.6 times of the poorest 10. The ten richest by order are Seychelles, Equatorial Guinea, Mauritius, Gabon, Botswana, South Africa, Namibia, Cape Verde, Swaziland and Angola while the ten poorest by rank are Congo Democratic Republic, Burundi, Eritrea, Guinea-Bissau, Niger, Malawi, Ethiopia, Central African Republic, Madagascar and Liberia.
  • Tanzania has the highest proportion of women aged 15-24 in its labor force (81%); Mauritania had the lowest (22%): Equatorial Guinea has the highest proportion of men aged 15-24 in its labor force (88%); Gabon has the lowest (27%).
  • In 2009 Equatorial Guinea had the highest adult literacy rate (93%); Chad had the lowest (34%).
  • In 2009, Lesotho had 95% of women literate; compared to the lowest the figure of 23% for Chad.
  • Seychelles has the highest gross enrolment rate in secondary education (119%); Central African Republic has the lowest (13%).
  • In Seychelles there are 13 children per primary school teacher; there are almost 84 in Central African Republic.
  • The number of clinical cases of malaria reported in Sub-Saharan Africa decreased by almost 1% between 2009 and 2010, while the number of reported deaths due to malaria increased by 15% during the same period.
  • Sierra Leone had the highest increase in reported deaths due to malaria from 2009 to 2010 (1,734 to 8,188); the highest decrease is in Côte d’Ivoire (18,156 to 1,023).
  • In Somalia 180 children per 1,000 die before the age of five; in Seychelles, the rate is 14 per 1,000 and 15 per 1,000 in Mauritius.
  • Sixteen (16) countries in Sub-Saharan Africa have child immunization rate for measles of over 90%. The highest in Eritrea, Mauritius and Seychelles at 99% respectively while the lowest in Chad and Somalia at 46%, respectively
  • In 2008, South Africa had the highest carbon dioxide emissions per capita of 8.9 metric tons, whilst Burundi had the lowest of 0.02 metric tons.
  • In Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, Guinea, and Niger 1 persons per 100 are internet users; there are 41 in every 100 people in Seychelles.
  • Incidence of tuberculosis per 100,000 people was highest in Swaziland (1,287 per 100,000 people). This was 58.5 times higher than the lowest (Mauritius at 22 per 100,000 people).
  • One of the oldest universities in the world is in Timbuktu, Mali. By the 12th century Timbuktu was home to three universities. Over 25,000 students attended one of the Timbuktu universities in the 12th century.
  • Nigeria is the most populated country in Africa with over 195 million people as of 2020. It is the 7th most populated country in the world. The majority of the population is either Muslim or Christian. Within the country are an astounding 520spoken languages.
  • Equatorial Guinea is the richest country in Africa. The GDP per capita is $30,200. Botswana is second with a GDP of $15,800. Coming in last is Zimbabwe at $200 per year.
  • Nearly half of all gold mined has come from Witwatersrand, South Africa.
  • Africa is the most centrally-located continent on the planet. Both the equator and the Greenwich Meridian line cross it. 
  • Morocco in Africa and Spain in Europe have less than 9 miles of ocean between them – creating the two continents’ shortest distance.
  • Victoria Falls is one of the 7 wonders of the world. It’s located on the border of Zambia and Zimbabwe.
  • You can hear the thunder of Victoria Falls’ water up to 40km away.
  • Nigeria has seen the most twins born in the world. This has earned the country the nickname “The Land of Twins”.
  • Africa has 135 UNESCO World Heritage Sites scattered across the continent. 
  • Inside the country of South Africa is a smaller, landlocked country called Lesotho.
  • Some houses in Tunisia are made from fish bones. This is because the locals believe fish have supernatural powers and will protect against evil spirits.
  • South African law allows car owners to install flame throwers on their cars to prevent hijacking. Although you won’t see many flame-throwing cars in the country’s streets. 
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