200 Unknown Facts About Cat You Didn't Know About Cats


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Unknown Facts About Cats in Hindi

  • Cats have 230 bones, while humans only have 206.
  • Cat breeders are called “catteries.”
  • Cats can be toilet-trained.
  • Cats can drink sea water in order to survive. (In case you’re wondering, we can’t.)
  • Cats don’t have an incest taboo, so they may choose to mate with their brothers and sisters.
  • Cats dream, just like people do.
  • Cats have contributed to the extinction of 33 different species.
  • Cats perceive people as big, hairless cats, says Wilde.
  • Kittens can be spayed or neutered when they are only eight weeks old. If possible, these procedures should be performed in the first 5 months of your cat’s life.
  • Male cats who have been fixed need fewer calories to maintain their weight.
  • Spaying and neutering can extend a cat’s life. The Banfield Pet Hospital study found that neutered males live an average of 62 percent longer than unneutered cats and spayed females live an average of 39 percent longer than unspayed cats.
  • Your cat’s grooming process stimulates blood flow to his skin, regulates his body temperature and helps him relax.
  • Facts About Cat Communication Cues
  • A cat with a question-mark-shaped tail is asking, “Want to play?”
  • Thieving behavior is not uncommon among cats. They will often grab objects like stuffed animals, feather dusters, and other things that remind them of prey.
  • A green cat was born in Denmark in 1995. Some people believe that high levels of copper in the water pipes nearby may have given his fur a verdigris effect.
  • Maria Assunta left her cat, Tomasso, her entire $13 million fortune when she died in 2011.
  • President Bill Clinton’s cat, Socks, was a media darling during the Clinton administration and was said to receive more letters than the President himself.
  • Stubbs, a 17-year-old orange tabby, is the mayor of the historic district of Talkeetna, Alaska.
  • A cat’s learning style is about the same as a 2- to 3-year-old child.
  • A housecat can run to the speed of about 30 mph over short distances. This means that a cat can outrun legendary runner Usain Bolt in a 200-meter dash!
  • Ever wondered why your feline friend would often put their rear end by your face? This is actually a sign of trust and your cat signaling that they feel safe and secure around you.
  • Cats can have a dominant front paw. Studies have shown that male cats tend to favor their left paw while female cats may have a dominant right paw.
  • Most cats have 18 toes-5 on their front paws, and 4 on their back paws. However, some cats can be born with extra toes, a condition called polydactylism.
  • The oldest cat to ever live was a cat named "Creme Puff", who lived to be 38 years and 3 days old. Creme Puff lived from August 3, 1967, to August 2005 with her owner in Austin, Texas.
  • Cats have a whopping 32 muscles in each of their ears, allowing them to swivel their ears to home in on the exact source of the noise. Additionally, cats can rotate their ears to 180 degrees!
  • Cats are nearsighted, but their peripheral vision and night vision are far superior compared to humans.
  • According to The Huffington Post, cats typically sleep for 12 to 16 hours a day.
  • Cats are crepuscular, which means that they’re most active at dawn and dusk.
  • Cats are fastidious creatures about their “bathroom.” If you have more than one cat, you should have one litter box for each.
  • Cats can spend up to a third of their waking hour's grooming.
  • Cats live longer when they stay indoors.
  • Cats’ purring may be a self-soothing behavior since they make this noise when they’re ill or distressed, as well as when they’re happy.
  • Cats will refuse unpalatable food to the point of starvation.
  • Despite popular belief, many cats are actually lactose intolerant.
  • Female cats have the ability to get pregnant when they are only 4 months old!
  • Cats groom other cats — and sometimes people — in a ritual called allogrooming.
  • Cats like to sleep on things that smell like their owners, such as their pillows and dirty laundry (ick!).
  • Cats love to sleep in laundry baskets, too, because they’re basically hiding places with peepholes.
  • Cats often attack your ankles when they’re bored.
  • Certain cats go crazy for foods you wouldn’t expect, like olives, potato chips, and hops in beer.
  • For some reason, cats really dislike citrus scents.
  • If you can’t find your cat, you should look in a box or a bag, as these are some of their favorite hiding spots!
  • Grapes and raisins, as well as onions, garlic, and chives, are all extremely harmful foods for cats. Grapes and raisins can cause kidney failure — although the reasoning behind that isn’t clear. Meanwhile, onions, garlic, and chives wreak havoc on your cat’s gastrointestinal system and can cause anemia.
  • If you keep your cat active during the day, he will sleep better at night. If you’re not free-feeding your cat, you can also help her get a good night’s sleep by providing her with a substantial evening meal.
  • It’s believed that catnip produces an effect similar to LSD or marijuana in cats. The effects of nepetalactone — the chemical in catnip that can make cats crazy — wears off within 15 minutes, and won’t surface again for a few hours, even if your cat remains in sniffing distance.
  • According to Wilde, a slow blink is a “kitty kiss.” This movement shows contentment and trust.
  • Cats have a unique “vocabulary” with their owner — each cat has a different set of vocalizations, purrs, and behaviors.
  • Cats have an extra organ that allows them to taste scents in the air, which is why your cat stares at you with her mouth open from time to time.
  • Cats have nearly twice the amount of neurons in their cerebral cortex as dogs.
  • Cats have the largest eyes relative to the head size of any mammal.
  • Cats make very little noise when they walk around. The thick, soft pads on their paws allow them to sneak up on their prey — or you!
  • Cats’ rough tongues can lick a bone clean of any shred of meat.
  • Cats use their long tails to balance themselves when they’re jumping or walking along narrow ledges.
  • Meowing is a behavior that cats developed exclusively to communicate with people.
  • When a cat flops over and exposes his belly, it’s not always an invitation for a belly rub. A cat does this when he’s relaxed and showing trust.
  • When cats hit you with retracted claws, they’re playing, not attacking.
  • When dogs wag their tails, they may be expressing happiness. But this isn’t the case for cats! When your cat wags her tail, it’s her way of warning you that you are getting on her last nerve.
  • When your cat sticks his butt in your face, he is doing so as a gesture of friendship.
  • Whiskers are also good indicators of a cat’s mood. When a cat is scared, he put his whiskers back. But when a cat is in hunting mode, he puts his whiskers forward.
  • Your cat drapes its tail over another cat, your dog, or you as a symbol of friendship.
  • The largest cat breed is the Ragdoll. Male Ragdolls weigh up to 20 lbs and females up to 15 lbs.
  • Blond or brown color change in Siamese kittens depends on their body temperature. Siamese cats carry albino genes that work at a body temperature above 98° F. If these kittens are left in a very warm room, their prints won’t darken and they will stay a creamy white all over.
  • Like dogs, cats only sweat through their paws.
  • A cat’s heart beats nearly twice as fast as a human heart, 110 to 140 beats per minute.
  • Onions, garlic, green tomatoes, raw potatoes, chocolate, grapes, and raisins are all bad for cats. Milk is not toxic but can cause an upset stomach and gas. Tylenol and aspirin are extremely toxic to cats, as are most houseplants. See the ASPCA for more cat facts about food.
  • With enough water, cats can tolerate temperatures up to 133 °F.
  • A cat’s nose pad has a unique pattern of ridges, just like a human fingerprint.
  • Most world languages have a similar word to describe the “meow” sound.
  • People often think that they’ve stumbled over a purebred as a stray or in a shelter, but Hogan says that this is very uncommon. “Ninety-nine times out of 100 what you have found on the street will not be purebred anything,” she says. “Very seldom do breeders sell kittens that are not already spayed or neutered,” as purebred cats need to meet very strict standards.
  • Some 700 million feral cats live in the United States, and many shelters run trap-neuter-release programs to stem the population growth.
  • Studies suggest that domesticated cats first appeared around 3600 B.C.
  • The first known cat video was recorded in 1894.
  • Meows are not innate cat language—they developed them to communicate with humans!
  • As kittens, they have 26 deciduous, or “baby”, teeth. As adult cats, they have 30 permanent teeth. Don’t forget to take care of those pearly whites with regular dental cleanings.
  • House cats share 95.6% of their genetic makeup with tigers. You read that right, TIGERS. They also share some of the same behavior habits such as scent and urine marking, prey stalking, and pouncing.
  • The whiskers on a cat aren’t just cute—they serve a very important function in assisting cats with getting around, especially at night. Cat whiskers are embedded deep in their body and are connected to the cat’s sensitive muscular and nervous systems, acting as touch receptors (or a “kitty radar”). Whiskers allow a cat to detect and respond to changes in their surroundings.
  • Additionally, not only do cats have whiskers on their face, but they also have a set of whiskers on the back of their front legs.
  • Cats can be left-pawed or right-pawed. Female cats tend to be right-pawed, while male cats are usually left-pawed. Interestingly, left-handed humans also tend to be male.
  • Cats make about 100 different sounds while dogs make only about 10.
  • A cat’s brain is biologically more similar to a human brain than it is to a dog’s. Both humans and cats have identical regions in their brains that are responsible for emotions.
  • The oldest pet cat was found in a 9,500-year-old grave on the Mediterranean island of Cyprus. Contrary to popular cat facts, this predates Egyptian pet cats by 4,000 years.
  • Cats are North America’s most popular pets: cats outnumber dogs 73 million to 63 million. Over 30% of North American homes have a cat.
  • A cat can jump five times its own height and sprint up to 31 mph.  
  • It’s not uncommon to see cats in food stores in big cities as a form of free — and adorable — pest control.
  • Kittens in the same litter can have more than one father. This is because the female cat releases multiple eggs over the course of a few days when she is in heat.
  • Male cats are the most sensitive to catnip, while kittens under 3 months old have no response at all.
  • There are about 88 million pet cats in the United States, which makes them the most popular pet in the country!
  • Two hundred feral cats prowl the park at Disneyland, doing their part to control rodents — the ones who don’t wear funny outfits and speak in squeaky voices.
  • White cats with blue eyes are prone to deafness.
  • Some cats have survived falls of over 65 feet. Their eyes and balance organs in the inner ear help cats to right themselves in mid-air and land on their feet.
  • The oldest cat to give birth did so at age 30 to two kittens.
  • A female cat is called a queen or a molly.
  • Cats are highly sensitive to vibrations and may be able to detect earthquake tremors 10 or 15 minutes before humans can.
  • A cat has no collarbone, meaning it can fit through any opening smaller than its head.
  • The first cat show was organized in 1871 in London and later became a worldwide craze.
  • A tower was built in Scotland for a cat named Towser in commemoration of her killing over 30,000 mice throughout her lifetime.
  • A house cat’s genome is 95.6 percent tiger, and they share many behaviors with their jungle ancestors, says Layla Morgan Wilde, a cat behavior expert and the founder of Cat Wisdom 101. These behaviors include scent marking by scratching, prey play, prey stalking, pouncing, chinning, and urine marking.
  • Cats are believed to be the only mammals who don’t taste sweetness.
  • Cats’ claws all curve downward, which means that they can’t climb down trees head-first. Instead, they have to back down the trunk.
  • Cats’ collarbones don’t connect to their other bones, as these bones are buried in their shoulder muscles.
  • Cats use their whiskers to “feel” the world around them in an effort to determine which small spaces they can fit into. A cat’s whiskers are generally about the same width as its body. (This is why you should never, EVER cut their whiskers.)
  • Cats walk like camels and giraffes: They move both of their right feet first, then move both of their left feet. No other animals walk this way.
  • Though cats can notice the fast movements of their prey, it often seems to them that slow-moving objects are actually stagnant.
  • Some cats are ambidextrous, but 40 percent are either left- or right-pawed.
  • Some cats can swim.
  • There are cats who have more than 18 toes. These extra-digit felines are referred to as being “polydactyl.”
  • A cat’s average lifespan increased by a year over the span of time between 2002 and 2012, according to a study by Banfield Pet Hospital.
  • Cats have up to 100 different vocalizations - dogs only have 10.
  • Cats find it threatening when you make direct eye contact with them.
  • Cats mark you as their territory
  • when they rub their faces and bodies against you, as they have scent glands in those areas.
  • Cats may yawn as a way to end a confrontation with another animal. Think of it as their “talk to the hand” gesture.
  • Hissing is defensive, not aggressive, says Wilde. “It’s an expression of fear, stress or discomfort of a threatened cat communicating ‘stay away,'” she says.
  • If cats are fighting, the cat that’s hissing is the more vulnerable one, says Wilde.
  • If your cat approaches you with a straight, almost vibrating tail, this means that she is extremely happy to see you.
  • Kneading — which some people refer to as “making biscuits” — is a sign of contentment and happiness. Cats knead their mothers when they are nursing to stimulate the let-down of milk.
  • Facts About Quirky Cat Behaviors — And Why They Happen
  • Cats are very fussy about their water bowls; some prefer to ignore their bowls entirely in favor of drinking from the sink faucet.
  • Male cats who try to get to a female in heat can show very bizarre behavior — for example, some have been known to slide down chimneys!
  • Many cats like to lick their owner’s freshly washed hair.
  • Some cats love the smell of chlorine.
  • A cat’s purr vibrates at a frequency of 25 to 150 hertz, which is the same frequency at which muscles and bones repair themselves.
  • A house cat could beat superstar runner Usain Bolt in the 200-meter dash.
  • About half of the cats in the world respond to the scent of catnip.
  • Cats were first brought to the Americas in colonial times to get rid of rodents.
  • Collective nouns for adult cats include “clowder,” “clutter,” “glaring,” and “pounce.”
  • Every Scottish Fold cat in the world can trace its heritage back to the first one, which was found in Scotland in the 1960s, says Cheryl Hogan, a Scottish Fold breeder and the committee chair for the breed at The International Cat Association (TICA).
  • In terms of development, the first year of a cat’s life is equal to the first 15 years of human life. After its second year, a cat is 25 in human years. And after that, each year of a cat’s life is equal to about 7 human years.
  • The hearing of the average cat is at least five times keener than that of a human adult.
  • In the largest cat breed, the average male weighs approximately 20 pounds.
  • A cat cannot see directly under its nose.
  • Most cats have no eyelashes.
  • Cats have five toes on each front paw, but only four on the back ones. It’s not uncommon, though, for cats to have extra toes. The cat with the most toes known had 32—eight on each paw!
  • Some believe that if you dream about a white cat, good luck will follow.
  • The wealthiest cat in the world, Blackie, had a fortune of £7 million, or $12.5 million in US dollars. When Blackie’s millionaire owner passed away, the owner refused to acknowledge any human family members in his will and instead gifted his massive fortune to his last surviving cat. Now that is one fortunate feline!
  • The oldest known pet cat existed around 9,500 years ago. In 2004, a French archeologist found a grave of a cat in Cyprus dating back to 9,500 years ago, meaning that humans have had cats as pets since then!
  • A female cat can become pregnant as young as 4 - 6 months of age. Spaying and neutering your cat around this age is the best way to prevent any unexpected litters and help reduce cat overpopulation.
  • Abraham Lincoln, the 16th President of the United States, absolutely loved cats and would play with them for hours. Lincoln owned several cats during his time in the White House.
  • Although a group of kittens is more commonly called a litter, they can also be known as a “kindle” of kittens.
  • Cats usually sleep around an average of 15 hours PER day. This means that a cat spends roughly 70% of their lives sleeping. It must be nice to be a cat!
  • Disneyland Resort in Anaheim, CA may be known as the “Happiest Place on Earth” but it’s also home to a squad of feral cats that freely roam around the theme park. Feral cats have been living at the Disneyland Resort for decades and are actually used to (ironically) help control the rodent population within the park. Mickey Mouse had better watch out!
  • In Ancient Egypt, members of a family would shave their eyebrows in mourning if their cat died. Cats were also sometimes mummified and placed in tombs with their owners.
  • On average, cats spend 2/3 of everyday sleeping and use 1/3 of their awake time cleaning themselves.
  • Unlike dogs, cats don’t have a sweet tooth. This could be due to a mutation in a key taste receptor.
  • The technical term for a hairball is a “bezoar”.
  • A group of cats is called a “clowder”.
  • Isaac Newton invented the cat flap to stop his cat “Spithead” from opening the door to his darkroom and ruining light-sensitive experiments.
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