170 Scary Facts About Alabama


Gadsden, Alabama

170 Interesting Facts About Alabama

  • Colbert County is home to the Key Underwood Coon Dog Memorial Graveyard, a cemetery reserved specifically for coon dogs. 
  • Postal workers take their jobs very seriously in the Magnolia Springs. It is the only location offering year-round postal delivery by boat, and has the USPS' only River Route. 
  • Shelby County Habitat for Humanity holds the record for world's fastest home building for a house they erected in Montevallo in 2002. Total time from start to finish? 3 hours, 26 minutes and 34 seconds. That is impressive! 
  • The Saturn V rocket used to launched the Apollo 11 spacecraft that would land the first people on the moon was designed at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. 
  • At the Hank Williams Museum in Montgomery (one of two state museums dedicated to him), you can see the '52 Cadillac in which he died—at the ripe old age of 29. 
  • Followers of Bonaparte tried and failed to cultivate grapes and olives in Alabama. Exiled Bonapartists founded Demopolis in 1817, followed by two smaller villages. The sites were abandoned when the cultivation attempts failed. Today, Demopolis is a thriving town.
  • Matilda, a Red Pyle chicken whose owners were from Bessemer, lived to the ripe old age of 16, a record for chicken longevity, according to the Guinness Book of World Records. Matilda was hatched in 1990 and lived until Feb. 11, 2006. She was purchased by Keith and Donna Barton, who kept her as a pet and featured her in Keith’s magic act.
  • There is only one town named Verbena, and it's in Alabama. Verbena, located in Chilton County, was named for the profuse wild flowers growing in the area. The town and its structures were added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1976.
  • Talladega Superspeedway, formerly named Alabama International Motor Speedway (AIMS), is a motorsports complex located north of Talladega, Alabama. It is the longest NASCAR oval with a length of 2.66-mile-long (4.281 km).
  • On December 14, 2019, Alabama celebrates its Bicentennial year (marks the completion of 200 years of its statehood).
  • Jesse Owens is an Olympic gold medalist who was born in Oakville, Alabama. He was the son of a sharecropper and grandson of a slave. He won four gold medals at the 1936 Olympic Games in Berlin.
  • Did you know that in 1836 Alabama was the first U.S. state to declare Christmas a holiday and Oklahoma in 1907 was the last to do so?
  • In terms of alcohol consumption, Alabama is one of the driest states in the U.S.
  • The last constitution adopted by Alabama in 1901, is the longest of all the state constitutions. the document has more than 376,000 words. Vermont has the shortest constitution (8,565 words) among the 50 states.
  • Alabama is the second leading catfish producing state in the U.S., surpassed only by Mississippi.
  • Montgomery native Nat King Cole was first the black man to host TV variety show. The Nat King Cole Show debuted on NBC-TV in 1956.
  • Eunice Merrill (1919-2004) was known for her biscuits and home-style cooking at Aunt Eunice’s Country Kitchen in Huntsville. When Fob James was governor, the Alabama Legislature passed a resolution naming her biscuits as the Official Biscuit of Alabama.
  • Pat Garret, the man who killed Billy the Kid, was born near Cusseta, Ala., on June 5, 1850. He was sheriff of Lincoln County, N.M. when he shot and killed the notorious outlaw July 14, 1881. Garrett himself was murdered Feb. 29, 1908. He is buried in Las Cruces, N.M.
  • Brundidge, Ala., celebrates its role in the peanut butter industry with a Peanut Butter Festival each October. One of the first commercial peanut butter mills was located in the Pike County town and produced 2 million jars at its peak.
  • Mobile rings in the New Year by dropping a 12 foot tall, 600 lb. mechanical moon pie.
  • The World's Largest (edible) Moon Pie was baked to celebrate the first-ever Mobile moon pie drop in 2008. It weighed 55 lbs. and contained 45,000 calories. 
  • The Alabama state quarter issued to commemorate Tuscumbia-born Helen Keller is the only circulating US coin to feature Braille lettering. 
  • The city symbol for Birmingham is the 56-foot tall, Vulcan, the world's largest cast-iron statue. Which makes sense because… 
  • Alabama is the only state with all of the natural resources to make iron and steel. 
  • Elodie Todd Dawson's widower made sure she had eternal curls. Elodie Dawson, half-sister of Mary Todd Lincoln, died in Selma in 1881. Her distraught husband, Col. N.H.R. Dawson ordered a statue in her likeness from Italy to place on her grave in Live Oak Cemetery. According to RuralSWAlabama.org, the statue that arrived did not include his wife's beautiful curls so he sent it back and had it remade. That statue still stands.
  • In the late 1850s, camels were imported to Dallas County, Ala., as part of an agricultural experiment, according to Linda Derry with Old Cahawba Archaeological Site. However, the animals weren’t suited for the climate and did not make good field workers.
  • A grave marker in Birmingham’s Elmwood Cemetery is inscribed on three sides with the words: "You Only Live Once, But If You Do It Right, Once Is Enough."
  • The arrest of Rosa Parks in 1955 when she refused to give up her bus seat to a white man in Montgomery became a key event in the civil rights movement. She is called “the mother of the civil rights movement“.
  • On 15 April 1886, Montgomery, Alabama became the first U.S. city to initiate an electric streetcar system for transportation, The Capital City Street Railway, also known as the Lightning Route. The system was however retired exactly after 50 years on April 15, 1936, and was replaced by buses.
  • Did you know that Saturn V, the rocket used by NASA to send people to the moon, was developed at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama? The first Saturn V was launched in 1967. The rocket was about the height of a 36 story-tall building and weighed about the weight of about 400 elephants.
  • Interestingly, due to the presence of a rocket building facility in Huntsville, it (Huntsville) earned the name “Rocket City U.S.A.”
  • Mary Anderson, born in Greene County, Alabama, is credited with the invention of windshield wipers. She was granted the patent for her invention in 1903. In 1922, Cadillac became the first car manufacturer to adopt them as standard equipment.
  • Harland Sanders (1890-1980), the founder of Kentucky Fried Chicken better known as Colonel Sanders, was born in Indiana but lived in Alabama as a young man. He worked as a blacksmith’s assistant for the Southern Railway in Sheffield. Sanders soon moved to Jasper to work as a stoker for the railway and met his first wife there. This photo shows Sanders in later life with Alabama Gov. George Wallace.
  • An Alabamian wrote "Beetlejuice." Michael McDowell, a horror novelist born in Enterprise, wrote the script for the 1988 Tim Burton film.
  • Chappo Geronimo (1867-1894), son of the legendary Apache warrior Geronimo, is buried in Mobile National Cemetery.
  • Patients at Bryce Hospital, Alabama’s first mental hospital, had many jobs at the massive facility in Tuscaloosa, including making wooden caskets. One of the coffins survives. It will be displayed in the Museum of Mental Health that will be housed in the original hospital, which is currently being renovated for use by the University of Alabama.
  • The nickname the “Yellowhammer State” originates from the fact that the Confederate troops placed yellow trimmings on their uniform during the Civil War. Yellowhammers are the birds with yellow patches under their wings.
  • Did you know that Martin Luther King, Jr. began his career as a local pastor at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery?
  • The Selma-to-Montgomery march in 1965 guaranteed the right to vote to all African Americans. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. participated in the march. He had recently won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964, which helped him draw attention to the difficulties faced by black voters, and the need for a national Voting Rights Act.
  • Did you know that the Spanish were the first Europeans to reach Alabama? This happened in 1540. But it was the French who settled first.
  • On January 11, 1961, Alabama seceded from the Union. The delegates from six states met at Montgomery and formed the Confederate States of America. Montgomery was chosen as the capital. Because of this, Montgomery is known as the “Cradle of the Confederacy.” The Confederate flag was designed and first flown in Alabama in 1861.
  • Did you know that Helen Keller, born on June 27, 1880, in Tuscumbia, Alabama, was the first deaf and blind person to earn a college degree? Directed by Arthur Penn, a film “The Miracle Worker” was also produced in 1962 depicting the story of the remarkable tutor Anne Sullivan and Helen Keller.
  • Explorer 1 was the first successful U.S. satellite. It was launched on Jupiter C rocket, which was built at the Army Ballistic Missile Agency in Huntsville, Alabama. The satellite was launched on January 31, 1958, from Cape Canaveral, Florida. The satellite orbited Earth every 114.8 minutes, making 12.54 orbits each day.
  • Did you know that Mobile, Alabama is the birthplace of America’s original Mardi Gras? The parade originated in 1703 in port city.
  • The Vulcan statue, the city symbol of Birmingham, Alabama, is the largest cast iron statue in the world. The 56-foot tall statue (from toe to spear point) depicting the Roman god Vulcan is the world’s largest iron-ore statue. It weighs 101,200 pounds. The statue was designed by the Italian artist Giuseppe Moretti.
  • Tom Wiggins (1849-1908), known as Blind Tom, was a slave and a gifted musician who historians now believe was an autistic savant. Wiggins, born in Georgia, lived with Gen. William Pinckney Howard and his wife Rebecca in Athens, Ala., who sponsored him at the height of his career. He toured the world and played for royalty. His compositions are still played today.
  • The Christmas novelty song “Grandma Got Run Over by a Reindeer" was sung by an Auburn grad. Elmo Shropshire of the group Elmo and Patsy got his veterinary degree from Auburn University.
  • Did you know one of Disney's most famous villains, Cruella De Vil, was from the Alabama? Although the 1961 film "101 Dalmatians" was set in London, the character of Cruella was voiced by Betty Lou Gerson, who was born in Chattanooga and raised in Birmingham. Gerson (1914-1999) also voiced the narrator in 1950's "Cinderella."
  • Sloths once roamed Alabama. Bones of two types of extinct giant ground sloths - the Megalonyx jeffersonii and Paramylodon harlani - that lived during the Ice Age have been found in Alabama. They could grow up to 9 feet tall and weigh more than two tons.
  • George F. Kirchoff (born 1932) of Montrose, known as the "father of the airbag," was part of a team that invented the safety feature introduced in 1987. Kirchoff, shown here with one of his many awards, graduated from Auburn University. For 35 years, Kirchoff led efforts to create the airbag while working at Thiokol Inc., Morton International and Autoliv Inc. before they became standard equipment.
  • Enterprise hosts the World's Smallest St. Patrick's Day Parade. Each year since 1993, the Enterprise Chamber of Commerce has held what it calls the World's Smallest St. Patrick's Day Parade. What makes it the smallest? It has one participant, a person chosen to be grand marshal and the entire parade.
  • The first female football player in Alabama was Luverne "Toad" Wise Albert (1922-1982). Albert, an Atmore native nicknamed "Toad" by a family friend as a child, became Alabama's first female football player - and some claim first in the country – when she joined the Escambia County High School team in 1939.
  • Did you know that Marie Bader, a 26-year-old from Mobile, Alabama, holds the world record for the fastest 10-kilometer run on sand? She completed the remarkable run in 55 minutes and 1 second.
  • In 1910, Wright brothers opened the first-ever in the U.S. civil aviation school on an old cotton plantation on the outskirts of Montgomery, Montgomery County. However, the flight school did not remain operational for a long time due to some problems.
  • Carl Lewis, the famous track-and-field athlete, who won nine Olympic gold medals during the 1980s and ’90s, was born in Birmingham, Alabama. He also won one Olympic silver medal, and 10 World Championships medals, including eight gold.
  • During the first half of the 19th century, cotton and slave labor played a central role in the state’s economy.
  • According to PEW research, Alabama is the most religious states in the US, followed by Mississippi (2nd), Tenessee (3rd), Louisiana (4th), and Arkansas (5th).
  • Auburn’s Battle Cry: Auburn War Eagle is neither a nickname nor a mascot. It carries a long history of great importance in the Auburn community. Students, fans, and alumni use the phrase ‘War Eagle’ as their unique identity no matter where they meet. The first legend of the battle cry dates back to 1892 when Auburn met Georgia on a football pitch. That day, his eagle that he had kept as a pet for 3 decades broke free and started circling the football ground. That is when Auburn steadily marched towards the end zone of Georgia and a victory ensued. Then the Auburn community shouted ‘War Eagle’ to cheer up their team. Suddenly, the bird took a dive and died after crashing on the field. It became a symbol of Auburn’s spirit.
  • Haunted Tuscaloosa Tours: there are several haunted sites in Tuscaloosa with hair-raising scenes starting from the historic Drish House. This is regarded as the most haunted dwelling place in Alabama. Together with the other 16 locations, it is associated with spine-chilling tales and dark history of Tuscaloosa. Visitors are offered guided tours on vintage bust-style coaches. The excursions may involve walking so it is advisable to wear comfortable footwear.
  • So I know Texas is the state that things they do big things. But (or maybe butt?) Anniston is home to the World's Largest Office Chair, made of 10 tons of steel. 
  • And also the World's Largest Hog monument in Dothan, 26 feet long and 13 feet high. 
  • The Gaines Ridge Supper Club in Camden is said to be haunted by a number of different spirits, one of them the ghost of an infant who was accidentally smothered while sharing a bed with his 350-lb. mother. 
  • A 1,010-gallon pot of baked beans cooked up at the 2010 Alabama Butterbean Festival was Guinness-certified as the World's Largest. I would say that’s a pretty big tease except that… 
  • “Father of the Blues” W.C. Handy found early musical inspiration in the clanging iron shovels of Florence's McNabb Iron Furnace.
  • The 1930s jazz standard “The Night the Stars Fell on Alabama” was inspired by a particularly spectacular meteor shower in the skies over Alabama. This song has become the anthem of Jacksonville State University, and their Marching Southerners band plays it at every home football game.  
  • The Berman Museum of World History in Anniston not only contains a collection of espionage paraphernalia said to rival that of the International Spy Museum in D.C., but it has on display a silver tea service that once belonged to Adolf Hitler. 
  • Dred Scott, whose name is associated with the landmark U.S. Supreme Court Dred Scott Decision of 1857, worked in Alabama. Scott was born in Virginia but lived and worked, as a slave, in Madison and Florence between 1818 and 1830. For a time, he was a hostler at the Peter Blow Inn in Florence and a historic marker was erected at the site. Historians believe his first wife was buried in Oakwood Slave Cemetery in Huntsville.
  • Sidney Lanier, the renowned poet from Georgia, wrote his only novel, "Tiger-Lilies" in 1867 while living in Montgomery, Ala, according to the Encyclopedia of Alabama. Lanier moved to Montgomery in 1865 and worked as a desk clerk at The Exchange Hotel and served as the organist at First Presbyterian Church in Prattville.
  • The telegram that began the Civil War was sent from Montgomery by Huntsville native and Confederate Secretary of War Leroy Pope Walker on April 11, 1861. A historic marker on Dexter Avenue gives the text of the telegram that authorizes the attack on Fort Sumter, while hoping to "avoid the effusion of blood." 
  • Unclaimed Baggage Center, Scottsboro: this is where the lost checked bags can be found. These include misplaced and mishandled cargos. The airlines have tremendously improved their services when it comes to the loss of luggage and handling of checked bags including electronic devices, clothes, and diamond rings. The misplaced items are returned to their owners within 2 days. Only a very small percentage remains unclaimed.
  • Largest Collection Of African-American Art: the University of Alabama received art worth 4.8 million dollars from Paul R. Jones as donations in 2008. The collection included over 1,700 pieces among them being the most sought-after African-American artworks. Jones brought the art after noticing the absence of fine art by African-American artists in the galleries, museums, and auctions.
  • The Hidden Alabama Waterfall: Never Sink Pit, Fackler is one of the most scenic limestone sinkholes. Water cascades down a 162-feet rocky portal. Cave divers frequent the site and capture incredible pictures of the breathtaking phenomenal. It is a top attraction for hikers, travelers, and adventurers.
  • Josephine Myrtle Corbin (1868-1928) was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., a dipygus, meaning she had an additional pair of smaller legs from an undeveloped twin. She was forced to live much of her life as "The Four-Legged Girl" in the circus but she married and had four children. Her first pregnancy was diagnosed by Dr. Lewis Whaley of Blount County, Ala., during a sideshow stop. He found she also had two sets of internal reproductive organs and wrote several medical reports on the subject.
  • An Alabamian directed the beloved 1983 film “A Christmas Story.” Bob Clark (1939-2007) was born in New Orleans but grew up in Birmingham.
  • Dr. Rexford Kennamer (1920-2013), who was born in Guntersville, would eventually move to Beverly Hills, Calif., where he would become personal physician to such stars as Elizabeth Taylor, Rock Hudson, Gary Cooper, Frank Sinatra, Jack Benny, gossip columnist Hedda Hopper and many others.
  • Forget Punxsutawney Phil: Alabama has a weather forecasting possum named Sand Mountain Sam, and two prognosticating groundhogs named Birmingham Bill and Smith Lake Jake. 
  • Alabama once had wooden roads. In 1849, the first plank road in the country was built by Daniel Pratt for the public and for transportation from his Pratt Cotton Gin to the Alabama River. It was constructed of large pine logs, sawed lengthwise and laid round-side down. These days, visitors can walk along a reproduction plank road, shown here, in Tannehill State Park near McCalla.
  • Frank James was tried for robbery in Huntsville. The brother of Jesse James was acquitted on April 25, 1884, after being charged with robbing a government payroll near Muscle Shoals in 1881.
  • On February 8, 2002, War Eagle VI, a golden eagle who flew before Auburn University football games from 1986-2006, made a special flight during the opening ceremonies of the Olympic Winter Games in Salt Lake City. She died in 2014.
  • The Biggest Fishing Pier in Gulf Coast: Gulf State Park offers a scenic spot for tourists who love fishing and eating fish. Stop by and rent or buy fishing equipment, baits, and licenses. The pier provides amazing experiences for any level catering to beginners and seasoned anglers. Depending on the season, you can catch various species including Spanish mackerel, king mackerel, sheepshead, flounder, cobia, red drum, etc.
  • The W.C. Handy Home and Museum: W.C Handy was born in 1873 in Florence in this cabin that houses today a massive collection of artifacts, memorials, and papers. Hailed as the father of blues, William Christopher Handy composed such lovely songs as “Beale Street Blues” and “St. Louis Blues.” A complete collection of his work including music, trumpet, and artifacts, is stored at the W.C. Handy Birthplace, Museum, and Library.
  • Did you know that on the night of November 12, 1833, a spectacular occurrence of the Leonid meteor shower had been observed in Alabama? The shower was so intense that many people thought that the world is coming to an end. The “night the stars fell” is mentioned in several stories about Ray County.
  • In 2017, a record 26 million tourists visited Alabama spending an all-time high of $14.3 billion.
  • The spiral staircase in the Alabama State Capitol was built by Horace King, who was an architect, engineer and bridge builder. He was born in slavery in South Carolina in 1807.
  • Did you know that Mercedes Benz established its first U.S. factory in Vance, Tuscaloosa, Alabama? It was also the first-ever automobile factory in the state. The plant started producing cars in January 1997.
  • The day it rained eels in Coalburg, Ala. In May of 1892, the New York Sun reported a strange event following a storm in the tiny community of Coalburg, Ala.: It was raining eels. And not just any eels, but a type "unknown in Alabama," according to "The Book of the Damned: The Collected Works of Charles Fort" published in 1919.
  • Maude McLure Kelly (1887-1973) was the first female lawyer in Alabama.
  • Born in Oxford, Ala., she got her law degree from the University of Alabama in 1908. A change in wording in the Code of Alabama, which referenced only male lawyers, was necessary for her to begin practicing law.
  • Just so you know, it ‘s illegal for a driver to be blindfolded while operating a vehicle. Hope this didn't just ruin your weekend plans.
  • It is illegal to wear a fake moustache that causes laughter in church. So serious fake moustaches only, folks. 
  • Alabama is the only state to have an alcoholic beverage as its official drink: Conecuh Ridge Whiskey. 
  • Alabama also had what may have been the World's Largest Senator: Dixon Hall Lewis weighed 500 lbs and occupying his seat in the Senate from 1844 until dropped dead in 1848, during his colleagues cracked that Alabama had the largest representation of any state. 
  • Apparently no one in Tuscumbia, Ala. has heard of “War or the Worlds” or Orson Welles because in 2013 the local radio station Star 94.9 thought it would be funny to publicize their programming change by pretending to be taken over by aliens on air… and people freaked the hell out, even keeping their children home from school. Oops. 
  • Montgomery's Lightning Route, established in 1886, was the first-ever electric streetcar system. 
  • Boogers may not be flicked into the Alabama wind. I mean, that’s just good advice (See also: Peeing into the wind). 
  • Mobile had to ban bicycles from the interstate highways. Because apparently basic common sense wasn’t deterrent enough. 
  • The museum also displays a pair of blue suede shoes Hank owned long before Elvis ever sang about them. 
  • It is a felony to engage in bear wrestling. Also, a really dumb idea. 
  • Unlike socks, we now know where all the missing baggage disappears to: Scottsboro, Ala. There is an Unclaimed Baggage Center there that houses all unclaimed baggage. 
  • Scratch Ankle, Smuteye and Chigger Hill are all places that exist, in like, reality… in Alabama. 
  • Love playing bones? Not on Sundays! because its illegal to play dominos on the sabbath in Alabama. 
  • Alabama is home to a giant rooster made of car bumpers. It was created by Larry Godwin and it lives three miles south of Brundidge on Hwy 231. 
  • Not to mention the World's Largest Catfish, located between Brundidge and Troy. This 28-foot whiskery whopper is even animated, with rolling eyes, flapping gills and a swishing tail. 
  • Downtown Enterprise has a very nice statue of a pretty lady on a pedestal. She is also holding what appears to be a trophy, and sitting atop...a big, ugly bug. Gross. Yep, this is the famous boll weevil monument. 
  • Prattville, Ala. is ome to the Cross Garden. This oddball roadside attraction—named in 2010 by “Time” as one of America's best—bears such inspirational messages as “Everyone in hell from sex used wrong way,” “Hell is hot hot hot,” and “You will die.” Good to know. 
  • “Sweet Home Alabama” was written to counter several songs by Canadian singer/songwriter Neil Young that had pretty much dissed the whole state.  
  • Now for something spooky… The Mount Nebo Baptist Church Cemetery in rural Clarke County has several tombstones featuring death masks cast from the people whose graves they mark. 
  • Krewes at Mobile's Mardi Gras started the tradition of tossing moon pies from parade floats in 1956, although this custom has now spread to other Gulf Coast locales (at least the cool ones that celebrate Mardi Gras). 
  • And speaking of Mardi Gras, Mobile's was actually the first one in the New World. It started in 1703, while those Jean-come-latelies in New Orleans didn't get theirs off the ground until sometime in the 1730s. So there, New Orleans.
  • In 1913 the most most popular boy name was James and William was No. 3. In 2013 the most popular baby name was William and James was No. 3. 
  • Hammerin' Hank Aaron and “Say Hey Kid” Willie Mays were both Alabama boys.
  • Speaking of famous folks from Alabama… The list is too long to recount but here are a handful of national treasures that were born right here in the Magnolia State: Lionel Richie, Octavia Spencer, Jimmy Buffett, Evander Holyfield, Felicia Day, and the queen of “Cougar Town” herself, Courtney Cox. What’s your favorite fun fact about Alabama? Tell us in the comments below!
  • An Alabama native designed the wedding dress worn by Jacqueline Bouvier when she married future president John F. Kennedy. Ann Lowe, who was living in New York at the time, hailed from Clayton, Ala. She was the daughter of a seamstress and great-granddaughter of a slave woman and plantation owner.
  • The Black Pearl was built in Alabama. One of the pirate ships featured in Disney’s “Pirates of the Caribbean” film franchise was built at Steiner Shipyard in Bayou La Batre. The ship, created from an existing craft, was used in the second and third films in the franchise.
  • There really is a place called Sweet Home, Ala., and it’s a historic house in Bessemer. A blend of Queen Anne and Neoclassical styles, it was built on Arlington Avenue in 1906 by architect William E. Benns for H.W. Sweet, Bessemer's first undertaker.
  • Born in Hopkinsville, Ky., in 1877, Edgar Cayce was one of the most renowned psychics of the turn-of-the-century spiritual movement. He was the Nostradamus of his day, answering questions on healing, wars and the end of the world while in a hypnotic trance, according to the Museums of Hopkinsville. Cayce, known as the Sleeping Prophet, would live for 13 years in Selma, working as a photographer.
  • Two Alabamians are buried in their feather beds. Billy Mitchell is buried in a crypt in Pine Hill Cemetery in Auburn. On his request, he was buried lying on his feather bed with his shoes tucked beneath. Grancer Harrison (1789-1860), known for his love of dancing, was buried in a tomb in Kinston (shown here), lying on his feather bed with his dancing shoes beneath.
  • Abbeville, Ala., is the first city in the nation alphabetically, both by city and state, in the Rand McNally Road Atlas.
  • The gorgeous spiral staircase inside the Cary Center at Auburn University is an architectural mystery. Built in 1840 as the Halliday-Cary-Pick home at 360 North College Street and now used as offices for Auburn University, the structure features a mahogany spiral staircase built during the home's construction by an itinerant French carpenter. The staircase has no visible means of support. 
  • The actor who played Kurt in “The Sound of Music” lived in Alabama. Duane Chase, the kid who hit the high note in “So Long, Farewell,” in the 1965 classic film starring Julie Andrews, left acting after the film. He moved to Tuscaloosa in 1978 to get his master’s degree in geology at the University of Alabama. After finishing his course work, he worked at the Geological Survey of Alabama while writing his thesis and later moved to Huntsville, where he worked at Intergraph Corp.
  • Alabama's official state Bible is signed by Jefferson Davis. The Bible also includes a hand-written note verifying it was the Bible used for Davis' swearing in as president of the Confederate States on Feb. 18, 1861, in Montgomery. The signature and note were added to the Bible in 1885 in case the veracity of its history was ever questioned. 
  • A public Bible is on display in Klein Park across from the Court Square fountain in Montgomery. It has been ensconced in a Plexiglass case since the 1940s, where it was placed by local businessman Ben W. Davis to provide inspiration for passersby.
  • Three Bigfoot movies have been filmed in Alabama: 2012's "Night Claws," in Mobile and Theodore; 2014's "Hunting the Legend" in Camden, Birmingham and other cities; and the 2016 spoof "Nigel and Oscar vs. Sasquatch," filmed in Mobile and Cheaha State Park.
  • Ridges seen in the soil in Wetumpka are the remnants of a 6-mile diameter crater made 85 million years ago by an asteroid estimated to have been 1,000 feet in diameter. It is one of only six craters in the world that is visible above ground, according to the Wetumpka Chamber of Commerce.
  • The state was named after the Alabama River. The origin of the word Alabama is considered to be from two words “Alba and Amo”. Alba refers to vegetables, herbs; and plants while Amo refers to gatherer or picker. The combination of these words “vegetation pickers” describes the Alabama Indians who were the early settlers in the region.
  • Founded by the French colonists in 1702, Mobile is the oldest city in the state.
  • The Civil Rights Memorial in Montgomery, Alabama, honors those killed in the struggle for racial equality. The memorial also has a timeline of key events and the names of the 40 victims etched in black granite. The memorial was designed by Vietnam Veterans Memorial designer Maya Lin. It is located on an open plaza accessible to visitors 24 hours a day, every day of the week.
  • Condoleezza Rice, the first African-American women to serve as U.S. secretary of state was born in Birmingham. Note that Birmingham is also the state’s largest city.
  • “Until justice rolls down like waters and righteousness like a might steam.” – These are his words that are inscribed on Montogomery’s Civil Rights Memorial.
  • Alabama’s Central Estuary: Mobile Bay serves as a historical area where fresh water from rivers mixes with marine waters that are brought by tides. Fresh water from the streams flows directly into the ocean hence mixing with salty water. There are incredible sights for history buffs, fishers, and strollers such as pelicans and freighters floating on waters.
  • Home of Martyrs: the Montgomery Civil Rights Landmarks make a memorial center for leaders who died during the 1954-68 civil rights war. There is a Wall of Tolerance whereby guests pledge to fight against hate and uphold tolerance.
  • Peanut Capital of the World: the biggest peanut festival in the United States takes place in Dothan, Alabama every fall. The city is actually hailed as the World’s Peanut Capital. The event pays homage to the agricultural heritage of Wiregrass area using whimsical sculptures around the town. People in this area demonstrate their love for peanut through a nutty artistic project that revolves around little goobers. The project comprises over 70 statues, peanut-themed and crafted by local artists. There is a popular statue names ‘The Peanut Man’ that pays tribute to Byron, a peanut peddler who used to sell boiled peanuts on the Main Street from a stand.
  • The Urban Legend of Sloss Furnace: when Sloss Furnaces closed down, it turned into the first industrial facility in the US for public use in 1981. The US Department of the Interior named it a National Historic Landmark which now hosts metal arts programs as the interpretive museum of industry. It is also a recognized venue for festivals and concerts.
  • The World’s Biggest Motorcycle Museum: Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum in Birmingham is where get to see a bronze statue featuring 3 men riding bicycles and wearing caps. It was established by George H. Barber, a bazillionaire who was the sponsor of the odd art projects like Bamahenge and Alabama’s Lady.
  • Point Mallard Park: a 750-acre Point Mallard Park in Decatur offers a golf-course, biking trails, and hiking. There is an aquatic center featuring water slides, wave pool, kiddie pools, and an Olympic-size diving pool. It also has a skating complex where skaters enjoy tear-round ice-skating.
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