140 Scary Facts About Connecticut


Connecticut

A to Z facts About Connecticut

  • John Haynes was Connecticut’s first governor.
  • Connecticut is one of the most densely populated states of the U.S.
  • The first fully operational steel mill in America opened in Simsbury, Connecticut, in 1728.
  • Mark Twain, an American writer, humorist, entrepreneur, publisher, and lecturer, wrote his famous adventure of Huckleberry Finn while in Hartford, Connecticut.
  • The first telephone book ever issued contained only fifty names. The New Haven District Telephone Company published it in New Haven in February 1878.
  • The USS Nautilus – the world’s first nuclear-powered submarine was built in Groton in 1954.
  • Connecticut and Rhode Island never ratified the 18th Amendment (Prohibition).
  • In 2008, the Supreme court legalized marriages between individuals of the same sex. And in 2003, Massachusetts became the first state to legalize gay marriages.
  • Connecticut and Rhode Island were the only two states that did not ratify the 18th Amendment, which prohibited the manufacture, sale, or transportation of alcohol.
  • PEZ├»¿?Candy is made in the city of Orange.
  • Thomas Sanford made the first friction matches in Beacon Falls in 1834.
  • Some of the world’s most famous cloth is woven in the Stafford textile mills.
  • The town of Washington was incorporated in 1779, being named in honor of General George Washington.
  • Hartford has remained the capital city of Connecticut since 1875.
  • On February 21, 1878, the first telephone book was issued in New Haven, CT. The book had the contacts of only 50 people representing the fact that the invention of the telephone was made recently. Alexander Graham Bell demonstrated his invention (the telephone) in New Haven.
  • In 1844, the first use of anesthesia was made in Connecticut by Horace Wells (Nitrous Oxide was used for the purpose).
  • Noah Webster, the author of the first American English dictionary was born in West Hartford, Connecticut on 16th October 1758.
  • Connecticut is one of the 48 contiguous states of the U.S.
  • Lollipops were invented by George Smith of New Haven, Connecticut in 1908. He had this idea of putting candy on a stick so that it is easier to consume. Lollipops were originally soft rather than hard.
  • Bear Mountain in Salisbury in the northwest corner of the state is the highest peak in the state.
  • The Old New-Gate Prison & Copper Mine (1773) in East Granby, Connecticut is the oldest surviving state prison in the nation. However, in 1827, the prison was abandoned. During its more than 50 years as a penitentiary, well over 800 prisoners had served time there, including four women.
  • Connecticut has 169 towns, 21 cities and 9 boroughs.
  • Connecticut is one of the six (Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut) New England states. 
  • On April 9, 1810, a Salisbury town meeting voted to authorize the “selectmen draw upon the town treasurer for the sum of one hundred dollars” to purchase more books for the Scoville Memorial Library collection, making the library the first publicly supported free town library in the United States.
  • Mary Kies, of South Killingly was the first woman to receive a U.S. patent. On May 15th, 1809 for a method of weaving straw with silk.
  • On January 28, 1878, 21 venturous citizens of New Haven became the world’s first subscribers to telephone exchange service.
  • America’s first trade association was founded in Naugatuck Valley.
  • Cattle branding in the United States began in Connecticut when farmers were required by law to mark all of their pigs.
  • In Hartford, you may not, under any circumstances, cross the street walking on your hands!
  • The first lollipop-making machine opened for business in New Haven in 1908. George Smith named the treat after a popular racehorse.
  • Ella Grasso was elected in her own right to be a state governor in 1974.
  • In 1937, Connecticut became the first state to issue permanent license plates for cars.
  • The World Wrestling Federation or the WWF is headquartered in Stamford.
  • Bristol, CT is considered the “Mum City” of the USA because of the many Chrysanthemums grown and sold to various states and Canada

Things to know about Connecticut

  • In 1784, New Haven was incorporated as a city.
  • Danbury, An important military depot for the American Revolutionary armies was burned and looted in April 1777 by the British under Major General William Tryon.
  • The first human inhabitants of present-day Burlington were members of the Tunxis Tribe, who belonged to a confederation of Algonquian Indians. Legend holds they used the area as a hunting ground.
  • The first English settlers of Connecticut arrived in 1636, settling the plantations of Windsor, Hartford and Wethersfield.
  • The Monroe Town seal is in the form of a circle with the words “Town of Monroe Connecticut” written in the outer rim of the seal. Inside this outer circle is a profile of a bust of James Monroe, who was the fifth President of the United States, serving from 1817-1825.
  • Originally, Montville, along with Groton and Waterford, was a part of New London. New London was settled in 1646 under the name of Pequot, so called after the Pequot Indians, the name changing to New London in 1658.
  • B.F. Clyde’s Cider Mill is the only steam-powered Cider Mill in the United States and is located in Mystic.
  • Connecticut is home of Samuel Colt, the inventor of the revolver. Connecticut was a leading manufacturer of guns and other arms.
  • Connecticut was once known as the “Arsenal of the Nation.” The nickname mainly originates from the fact that during the 19th and 20th century, the state was home to many companies that manufactured firearms including Volcanic Repeating Arms Company, Sturm Ruger, Joslyn Firearms and Winchester Repeating Arms Company.
  • The inventor of the process of vulcanization, Charles Goodyear, was born in New Haven, Connecticut. Goodyear was a self-taught chemist and engineer who received patent number 3633 from the United States Patent Office on June 15, 1844.
  • Did you know that between 1790 and 1890 over 20,000 patents had been granted to over 5,000 Connecticut inventors (including 44 women). 
  • The “Constitution State” is the birthplace of the world’s first practical helicopter. Designed by Vought Sikorsky, the VS-300 took flight at Stratford, Connecticut on September 14, 1939.
  • Connecticut and Rhode Island have no county government. All county governments in Connecticut were abolished on October 1, 1960.
  • Did you know when and where the first hamburger in the United States was made? Learn that Louis’ Lunch in New Haven, Connecticut is the first and the oldest still operating hamburger serving restaurant in the U.S.
  • Yale University is located in New Haven, CT. Established in 1701, Yale University is the third-oldest institution of higher education in the United States. U.S. Presidents such as Gerald Ford, William Howard Taft, George W. Bush and Bill Clinton have all attended it.
  • The first public tree planting program in America was conducted in New Haven, CT. The city was given the nickname “The Elm City” because the trees planted in the program were elms.
  • The world’s first nuclear submarine–USS Nautilus (SSN-571)—was constructed in Groton, Connecticut, between 1952 and 1954. It had the ability to remain submerged almost indefinitely because it used nuclear fuel and no air. It lasted in service for 25 years.
  • The Scoville Memorial Library in Connecticut is the oldest publicly funded library in the U.S. It was established in 1771 by a local man named Richard Smith. Richard brought the first set of 200 books from London, with the funds contributed by thirty-nine people from the town of Salisbury.
  • Hartford, the state’s capital is called the “Insurance Capital of the World”. In 1898, the first car insurance in America was issued at Hartford.
  • In 1937, Connecticut became the first state to issue permanent license plates to cars.
  • New Milford’s worst disaster struck in 1902 when the main business section centered on Bank Street was almost completely leveled by the “Great Fire”.
  • Named in 1724 for the stony character of the hilly countryside, North Stonington was incorporated in 1807.
  • Be at least 18 years old on or before the next election
  • Not be convicted of a felony
  • The manufacturing of the first safety fuse started in Simsbury in 1836.
  • In 1728, the first steel mill operating in America was located in Simsbury.
  • Wallingford has earned a worldwide reputation for the production of silverware.
  • The first expert in the treatment of Asiatic cholera was Dr. Henry Bronson in 1832. He was a professor at Yale Medical School.
  • The first golf tournament in Connecticut for women only was held in Waterbury on June 12, 1917.
  • West Hartford is the birthplace of Noah Webster, the author of the first dictionary published in 1807.

Connecticut Quick Facts

  • The state is named after the Connecticut River, which bisects the state and is a major river in the U.S. The Connecticut River flows through the center of the state, south to the Long Island Sound. The word “Connecticut” is derived from the Native American word quinetucket, meaning “besides the long, tidal river”. The Connecticut River flows through four states including – New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, and Connecticut.
  • Arriving in 1614, the first settlers in the state were the Dutchmen. The Dutch were fur traders who built a fort near present-day Hartford.
  • On August 22, 1902, Theodore Roosevelt became the first U.S. president to ride in an automobile while in office. He stopped in Hartford’s Pope Park and spoke to a gathering of about 10,000 workers. Interestingly, Mr. Roosevelt was also the first president to own a car and have a telephone in his home.
  • In 1901, the first law regulating the speed of a motor vehicle was imposed in Connecticut. Initially, the law restricted the drivers not to exceed 12 mph.Connecticut is one of the original 13 colonies (Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Georgia, Connecticut, Massachusetts Bay, Maryland, South Carolina, New Hampshire, Virginia, New York, North Carolina, and Rhode Island).
  • Did you know why Connecticut became known as the “Provision State”? It is due to the fact that during the revolutionary war, Connecticut sent many supplies and cannon to the Continental Army.
  • Connecticut is nicknamed the “Constitution State” because “The Fundamental Orders of Connecticut” first adopted in 1639, served as a model for the U.S. Constitution. The orders were the first laws that acknowledged people as the true foundation of public authority and it gave voters the right to elect government officials.
  • Connecticut has the highest personal income per capita (more than $70,000) in the country. However, the national average is $50,392.
  • In the area, only Delaware and Rhode Island are smaller than Connecticut.
  • Between 1701 and 1874, the state had two capitals, New Haven and Hartford.
  • In print since October 29, 1764, The Hartford Courant is the oldest continuously published newspaper in the United States.
  • Hartford Public High School in Hartford, CT is the second-oldest public secondary school in the U.S. It was founded in 1638.
  • New Haven, CT is the birthplace of George W. Bush, the only U.S. president born in the state.
  • Edwin Land was born in Connecticut. This genius is credited with patenting 535 inventions, more than anyone except Thomas Edison (1,097 American patents). Wondering what was his famous invention; learn that it was his Polaroid Instant Camera. With this camera, he made possible for a picture to be taken and developed in 60 seconds or less.
  • Bridgeport is Connecticut’s largest city followed by New Haven and Hartford.
  • ESPN, the world’s first sports cable channel was launched in Bristol, Connecticut in 1979. With this fact also learn that Stamford, Connecticut is where the headquarters of World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc. is located.
  • Lyme disease (spread by ticks in Northern Hemisphere) was first identified in 1975 in Old Lyme, Connecticut.
  • Lake Candlewood is the largest lake in Connecticut. The lake has an area of 8.4 square miles, and some of the most expensive real estate in Connecticut is located on the shores of the lake, in the towns of Brookfield, New Fairfield, New Milford, and Sherman.
  • Connecticut can be divided into three geographic regions. The Western Uplands (filled with steep hills), the Central Lowlands (contains ridges and valleys) and Eastern Uplands (has hills, rivers, and dense forest.)
  • Among the 50 states, Connecticut is first on the list of the percentage of urban lands covered by trees. Close to 60% of the state’s land is covered by forest. The most common tree in Connecticut is the red maple.
  • In 1705, copper was discovered in Simsbury. Later, the copper mine became the infamous New-Gate Prison of the Revolutionary War. Doctor Samuel Higley of Simsbury started the first copper coinage in America in 1737.
  • The Scoville Memorial Library is the United States oldest public library. The library collection began in 1771, when Richard Smith, owner of a local blast furnace, used community contributions to buy 200 books in London. Patrons could borrow and return books on the third Monday of every third month. Fees were collected for damages, the most common being “greasing” by wax dripped from the candles by which the patrons read.
  • Connecticut is home to the oldest U.S. newspaper still being published: The Hartford Courant, established in 1764.
  • Connecticut has approx. 144 newspapers published in the State (daily, Sunday, weekly and monthly).
  • Connecticut is home to the first hamburger (1895), Polaroid camera (1934), helicopter (1939), and color television (1948).
  • The first automobile law was passed by the state of CT in 1901. The speed limit was set at 12 miles per hour.
  • The first blast furnace in Connecticut was built in Lakeville in 1762.
  • The Submarine Force Museum in Groton is home of the historic ship Nautilus (SSN 571). It is the official submarine museum of the United States Navy.
  • Connecticut State insect is the Praying Mantis.
  • Connecticut’s most important crops are dairy, poultry, forest and nursery, tobacco, vegetables and fruit.
  • Connecticut’s motto is Qui Transtulit Sustinet — “He Who Transplanted Still Sustains”.
  • In colonial New Haven cut pumpkins were used as guides for haircuts to ensure a round uniform style. Because of this fashion, these New Englanders were nicknamed “pumpkin-heads.”
  • The name Middlebury derives from the central position the Town’s meetinghouse occupies, six miles from three older neighbors, Waterbury, Southbury, and Woodbury.
  • 7-year-old James Thorsell designed the New Hartford “Town Bicentennial Emblem”.
  • Although West Haven is Connecticut’s youngest city, being incorporated in 1972, it is a community that dates back over 360 years, making it one of the oldest settlements in the country.
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