250 Facts About Idaho


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250 Interesting Facts About Idaho

  • Pocatello is home to Idaho State University.
  • Post Falls is known as Idaho’s River City.
  • Saint Stanislaus Church, in Rathdrum, is the oldest brick church in the state of Idaho.
  • Idaho is home to over four hundred species of bird!
  • Sun Valley in Idaho is a celebrity hotspot, with Arnold Schwarzenegger and Mark Zuckerberg being just two of the famous famous who own homes there.
  • Idaho is believed to have one of the most neutral dialects in the United States, with no specific quirks!
  • 90% of America's lentils are grown in Idaho, it's not just about the potatoes!
  • The comedy turned cult classic 'Napoleon Dynamite' was filmed in Preston Idaho in 2004.
  • The complex song and dance routine 'Born In A Trunk In The Princess Theater In Pocatello, Idaho' was performed by Judy Garland in the 1954 movie 'A Star Is Born'.
  • Ever wanted to visit a ghost town? Idaho is home to over a hundred spooky abandoned towns!
  • In 1974 Evel Knievel the motorcycle stuntman attempted to jump Twin Falls in Idaho.
  • An excavation of Wilson Butte Cave in 1959 unearthed artifacts that date back to approximately 14,500 years old, making them among some of the oldest man-made artifacts in the country.
  • Five historic pioneer trails cross Idaho, including the Oregon Trail and the California Trail. Wagon ruts are still visible along the rugged dirt paths.
  • In the 1800’s, several sightings of a creature in Bear Lake led to tales of the Bear Lake Monster. To this day, some locals still refuse to go in the water or even go fishing at night.
  • Nearly 70 percent of all the commercial trout sold in the United States is found in the Hagerman Valley near Twin Falls.
  • Sarah Palin will forever be irrevocably tied to Alaska, but she was born in Sandpoint, Idaho.
  • Legend has it that X marks the spot in Beaver Canyon with a treasure hidden and buried by Montana sheriff-turned outlaw, Henry Plummer.
  • There are about 40 wineries in Idaho.
  • The Portneuf Greenway Trails: the Portneuf Greenway links Pocatello parks and other parts of the city. It is an ideal avenue for exercising, exploring nature and evading traffic. It runs through Old Town Pocatello, a river corridor, riverfront parks, as well as the Idaho State University.
  • A City With Speculations About Its Name’s Origin: the origin of the name Nampa is hypothetical. Some early residents used to call it New Jerusalem due to the presence of a big religious community. In other speculations, the name Nampa means ‘foot’ in Native Americans. Yet, historians claim the place was named after Nampus- a Shoshone chief. Local legends has it that Nampa means “Namb” (footprint) or moccasin.
  • Sunnyslope Caldwell, Heart Of Idaho Wine Country: it is said that love is grown and crafted in Sunnyslope Wine Trail. The area produces most of the State’s vineyards and 50% of the wineries are found here. It is an ultimate destination for wine tasting, panoramic views, and dining.
  • Bayhorse – The Longest Running Silver City in Idaho: in the late 1800s, Bayhorse was an established goldmine camp. Ten years later, it started to attract attention when a silver vein was discovered in Beardsley and Ramshorn mines. Gradually, it turned out to be the greatest producer of silver in Idaho State until 1915.
  • Idaho is home to the largest hops farm in the world, Elk Mountain Farms, which grows hops for parent company Anheuser-Busch on 1,800 acres of land.
  • At around 7,900 feet, Idaho’s Hell’s Canyon is the deepest gorge in the United States, even deeper than the Grand Canyon.
  • Aaron Paul might be known for “Breaking Bad” in New Mexico, but he was born and raised in Emmett, Idaho.
  • Silver City, the Burke, and Custer are just a few of Idaho’s many ghost towns.
  • The Fosbury Flop, a high jumping technique, was invented by Dick Fosbury in Ketchum in high school. The clip speaks for itself.
  • The first alpine chairlift was used in Sun Valley in 1936, for 25 cents per ride.
  • Idaho has 3,100 miles of rivers, more than any other state in the country.
  • Idaho’s Shoshone Falls is known as the Niagara Of The West. It drops 212 feet, actually beating out the Niagara Falls Of The East by 45 feet.
  • In Idaho it’s illegal to fish while sitting on the back of a camel or a giraffe.
  • Weiser is Home of the National Old Time Fiddlers Contest.
  • The “Idaho Enterprise” published its first issue on June 6, 1879 and is one of the oldest weekly publications in Idaho.
  • President Theodore Roosevelt established the Caribou National Forest in 1907. The area now covers more than 1 million acres in southeast Idaho.
  • In 1924 local McCall resident and Olympic ski champion, Cory Engen, started the celebration known as the Winter Carnival to help curb the boredom of the long McCall winters.
  • Meridian is named for the Boise Meridian, the Idaho land surveyor’s north-south line running through Initial Point, located 16 miles due south of the city.
  • Annually Mountain Home Air Force Appreciation Day boasts presenting the largest parade in Idaho.
  • Idaho ghost towns include Silver City, Yankee Fork, Gold Dredge, and the Sierra Silver Mine.
  • Heyburn, originally named Riverton, is the fourth oldest community in the Mini-Cassia area and the second frontier town to be settled in what is now the county of Minidoka.
  • Bruneau Dunes State Park contains North America’s tallest single structured sand dune. It stands 470 feet high.
  • Bruneau Canyon Overlook offers a view into a 1,200 foot-deep, 800-foot-wide river canyon.
  • Downey’s first mercantile store, the W. A. Hyde Co., was built in 1894.
  • The Kamiah Valley is rich in the heritage and legends of the Nez Perce. It was here, among the ancestors of the present day Nez Perce, the Appaloosa horse was first bred, primarily for use as a war animal.
  • In 1973, the Sawtooth Recreation Area opened its doors north of Ketchum, making the community the gateway to the Sawtooths.
  • On August 8, 1905, Kimberly auctioned city lots for prices ranging from $100 to $750.
  • Idaho’s world famous hot springs are located in Lava Hot Springs.
  • Hell’s Canyon is the deepest gorge in America.
  • Shoshone Falls, The Niagara of the West, spills over a 212-foot drop near Twin Falls.
  • Surprisingly, the potato isn't native to the state of Idaho! They were brought to Idaho in 1836 as a gift for the Nez Perce tribe.
  • Idaho now produces a third of all the potatoes grown in the United States. This adds up to around 27 billion potatoes per year!
  • Idaho's climate makes it ideal for growing potatoes, with high altitude summer day temperatures and much cooler evenings.
  • Due to the concentration of volcanic dust in the area, the soil in Idaho is very light and has a rich supply of minerals, another plus for growing the perfect potato.
  • Idaho is home to its own potato museum, which hosts the world's largest potato chip.
  • Idaho has branched out from the baked potato into some adventurous potato themed treats, our favorite is the 'Idaho Spud', a potato shaped marshmallow treat covered with chocolate and coconut.
  • Most Inland Seaport on West Coast: the port of Lewiston is situated 465 miles off the ocean. It exposes the Inland Northwest to worldwide trade markets by linking to Columbia Snake River System. It is an intermodal transportation hub that offers instant access to a rail route, airport, road, and river.
  • Post Falls- An Authentic Mill Town: named after Frederick Post, Post Falls welcomes visitors with ponderosa pine, beautiful cliffs, and forested areas. Frederick, a German immigrant created a lumber mill beside Spokane River in 1871. Post Falls is also a gateway to North Idaho. Prime golfing, lodging and dining are activities for all seasons.
  • Moscow the Green City: with more than 27 sq. meters of parks per individual, Moscow can be compared to other green cities of the world like Paris and New York. There are 18 gardens, 96 parks, 4 botanical centers, and a zoo with over 6,500 specimens.
  • This region is home to the Treefort Music Fest, which is held in Boise. It is perhaps one of the most successful modern country music festivals in America.
  • In the Treasure Valley: the Treasure Valley in Boise offers a plethora of fun activities throughout the year. Apart from big treats like Quinn’s Pond, Camel’s Back Park, and Table Rock, there are other hidden gems for family vacations. One of the popular summer activities in Boise is floating the Boise River. There is a floatable stretch between Morrison Park and Barber Park.
  • Roaring Springs, Meridian: unleash your inner child at the biggest waterpark in Meridian. Catch some waves, float along a lazy river, or enjoy the water slides. Next door you will find mini golf, bumper cars, and bowling.
  • Rexburg Sits on a Volcano: sitting atop a shield volcano is the city of Rexburg. Centuries ago, hot magma cascaded from the active shield volcano and caused a massive accumulation of edifice on the ground. This edifice is the present city of Rexburg.
  • This state is home to Atomic City, which was booming when the National Reactor Testing Station was active in the 70s. It is a desolate area with around 29 people now.
  • There is a ski resort in McCall, Idaho that is home to the Brundage Bra Tree. The name is known throughout Idaho because it is where many women throw their bras as they ride a chairlift.
  • One 1800’s tale says there is a strange creature in Bear Lake, Idaho. It is known as the Bear Lake Monster, and this story has scared some kids in the state.
  • This region is home to the highest navigable river in the world. The river is called St. Joe River, and it flows from an elevation of nearly 7,000 feet. Most of its trailheads follow through moderate slopes that are easy to trek. Commonly known as shadowy St. Joe, the river is one of the finest spots for camping, hiking, fishing, and whitewater rafting in the region. The Scenic Byway travels along the river. It is named after the towering cottonwoods that beautify the oceanfront in addition to the idyllic mountainous landscape. Moose, bear, elk, deer, can be spotted on the river’s edge.
  • A mayor seemed to have a strange adoration for his small town in Idaho. He declared that Wallace, with a population of 800 people, was the Center of the Universe. A manhole cover was made to mark this declaration and the place he said was the center.
  • Idaho produces other crops besides potatoes. The state is actually known as the Lentil Capital of the World. It is also known for having one of the largest hops farms in the United States.
  • This state is known for having a canyon with an interesting name. The canyon is called Hells Canyon, and it’s 7,900 feet deep. Keep in mind that this is deeper than the Grand Canyon. High above the canyon is Heaven’s Gate Lookout where you can gaze at the entire state of Idaho plus the Bitterroot Mountains in Montana.
  • Apparently Idaho agreed with Hemingway, because he returned in 1959 and bought a house in Ketchum, where he lived until his death in 1961.
  • It is against the law in Idaho for a man to give his sweetheart a box of candy weighing more than 50 pounds.
  • Napoleon Dynamite lives in the flippin’ sweet town of Preston, Idaho. Gosh.
  • The Idaho State Penitentiary is rumored to be haunted, and was featured on the show “Ghost Adventures.” No ghosts were found.
  • Idaho State Penitentiary was built by prisoners in 1870. It had two major prisoner riots in 1971 and 1973.
  • Soda Springs is home to the largest man-made geyser.
  • In Pocatello, it’s against the law to be seen in person without a smile on your face. Luckily for emo kids everywhere, the law’s not enforced.
  • The state seal of Idaho is the only one in the country that was designed by a woman.
  • The statehouse in Boise (along with a dozen other of the city’s buildings) are geothermally heated by Idaho’s many underground hot springs.
  • You have to go to Seven Devils Campground to reach Heaven’s Gate Lookout. Irony.
  • Hailey is also the birthplace of famed poet Ezra Pound.
  • Atomic City had a regular population in 1975 when it neighbored the National Reactor Testing Station and was home to the Experimental Breeder Reactor. Today, about 29 people live in the desolate town with one store and one bar.
  • The Idaho Potato Museum in Blackfoot features the world’s largest potato chip. Resembling a Pringle, the chip is a reported 25 inches by 14 inches.
  • Rigby, Idaho is the childhood home of the inventor of the TV, Philo T. Farnsworth, and is self-proclaimed as the birthplace of television.
  • The entire town of American Falls, Idaho was relocated in 1925 to make way for the American Falls dam.
  • Idaho has a bra tree. It’s become a tradition for women to throw their bras from the chair lift at a ski resort in McCall, Idaho, giving the Brundage Bra Tree its name.
  • C’ouer D’Alene Resort Golf Course is home to the first retractable floating golf course.
  • The landscape of Idaho includes dozens of mountain ranges, including The Rocky Mountains which cover the state from north to south.
  • The Bitterroot Range is a sub range of the Rocky Mountains, running along the border of Idaho and Montana. The range spans 1.3 million acres.
  • The Shoshone Falls in Idaho has been called 'The Niagara Falls of the West', and in fact, the Shoshone Falls actually drops 45 feet further than Niagara Falls!
  • The Columbia Plateau spreads across the south of Idaho. Due to the volcanic eruptions that occurred between 15,000 and 2,000 years ago, this area is almost almost totally flat.
  • Over the space of 2,000 years there were eight volcanic eruptions across central Idaho. The Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve in central Idaho was formed by the dried lava flow spreading and drying across the earth.
  • Idaho is home to several young volcanoes, including the Craters of the Moon, Wapi, Kings Bowl, North and South Robbers, Cerro Grande, Hells Half Acre, and  the Shoshone lava fields. Craters of the Moon is the youngest and is only laying dormant, so potentially could erupt again at some point!
  • Hells Canyon, Idaho is the deepest river gorge in North America, it reaches a depth of 7,993 feet.
  • Shockingly, it wasn't until 1990 that the first Indigenous American attorney general was elected in America. Larry Echo Hawk was elected and served in Idaho from 1991 to 1995. Echo Hawk went on to become the United States Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Indian Affairs in 2009.
  • Have you ever wondered how Idaho got its name? It was suggested by lobbyist George Willing, he said the word meant "gem of the mountains", or "the sun comes from the mountains", in the native Shoshone language. Others alleged that the name Idaho was of Apache origins, from the word 'ídaahę́' which means "enemy". George Willing eventually admitted that he made it up on the spot!
  • Idaho became a territory in 1863 and was named the 43rd state on 3 July, 1890.
  • In 1891 Emma Edwards Green, an art school graduate, entered a competition to design the Idaho state seal. She used only her initials as otherwise the entry would have been discounted and she won the competition! Idaho's state seal is still the only one in the US designed by a woman!
  • The Idaho state seal depicts a miner, a woman signifying justice and various state natural resources, surrounded by a yellow and gold band with a banner declaring the motto of Idaho.
  • During the Gold Rush of the early 1800s, one quarter of Idaho's population was Chinese. By 1870, the majority of all Idaho miners were actually Chinese.
  • Grangeville is located in north central Idaho. The community is considered the getaway to five wilderness areas and four national forests totaling 5 1/2 million acres. The total is second only to Alaska in designated wilderness area.
  • In 1896 Council Valley shortened its name to Council.
  • The Lewis & Clark Highway (United State Highway 12) is the shortest route from the midwest to the Pacific Coast and the longest highway within a national forest in the nation.
  • The elevation of Cambridge is 2,650 feet above sea level with the surrounding mountains reaching elevations around 8000 feet and plummeting to around 1500 feet in Hells Canyon.
  • The economy of Idaho City originally developed around gold mining in the 1860s.
  • Kuna is known as the Gateway City to the Birds of Prey Natural Area.
  • Birds of Prey Wildlife Area is home to the world’s most dense population of nesting eagles, hawks, and falcons.

Creepy facts about Idaho

  • Dog lovers should be interested in Idaho because it is home to the only dog-shaped B&B in the world. For those who want to visit the dog lover’s paradise, it is in Cottonwood, ID.
  • There is a small town in Idaho that has the longest main street in the United States. It is located in the City of Island Park.
  • The Coeur d’Alene Resort is home to the only man-made 14th hole island. It definitely gives golfers a new experience.
  • A gargantuan tree can be found at The Elk River. It is called the Idaho Champion Western Red Cedar Tree. It has an 18-feet diameter and it’s over 170 feet tall.
  • Idaho City can thank gold for its success. Yes, the city’s economy boomed because of gold mining back in the 1860s.
  • Idaho definitely stepped up to the plate when it came to structured sand dunes. Bruneau Dunes State Park is home to the country’s tallest structure that stands 470 feet high.
  • The capital city of Boise was named when French-Canadian trappers arrived in the early 1800s and were so relieved to see the forest and river that they exclaimed “Les bois! Les bois!” (“The trees”)
  • In 2004, the mayor of Wallace, Idaho—a town with a population under 800 people—declared the town as the Center Of The Universe, complete with a manhole cover painted to mark the site.
  • Idaho shares a border with Canada, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Wyoming, and Washington.
  • Idaho is also called The Gem State and produces 72 types of precious and semi-precious stones. It’s believed that the largest diamond found on U.S. soil was discovered in Idaho.
  • The Boise State University Broncos play on the world’s only blue football field, known as The Smurf Turf.
  • All of Idaho's wilderness combined spans 4.7 million acres.
  • The state's highest peak is the Borah Peak, which reaches 12,662 feet.
  • Sun Valley in southern Idaho attracts skiers from all over the world. The area started attracting tourists for ski holidays in the late '30s, thanks to  Ernest Hemingway (a huge fan of Idaho!) recommending the resorts.
  • The Snake River Plain is a prominent depression reaching across southern Idaho, formed by a volcanic hot spot. The plain covers 400 miles and is arc shaped, with a northern concave side.  
  • The Snake River itself is approximately 1,078 miles long, this makes it the ninth longest river in the United States.
  • Idaho is one of nine panhandle states, so called because they resemble a literal panhandle. However the northern section of the Idaho panhandle is also referred to as 'The Chimney' because of how the shape appears on the map.
  • Montana, Wyoming, Utah, Nevada, Oregon and Washington are all states that border Idaho. Idaho is also right on the border of Canada!
  • The climate in Idaho is variable, with super hot summers and cold winters, although it is mostly dry.
  • Idaho is nicknamed 'The Gem State' because almost every known type of gemstone has been found in the there!
  • Over seventy two different gemstones are currently mined from Idaho.
  • The largest diamond ever found in the whole of the United States was found in Idaho, it weighed in at nineteen and one-half carats.
  • The star garnet is Idaho's state gem. There are only two places in the entire world where this stone can be found: India and Idaho! These garnets got their name because the stone causes a reflection that looks like a four or six pointed star.
  • The state’s name derived from a Native American word that means “the land of many waters.” The pronunciation is similar to the state’s name.
  • Idaho is sometimes referred to as the Gem State. One can find nearly 72 types of precious stones in the state.
  • The state grows nearly one-third of America’s potatoes. It is likely that the people living outside the state eat more of these starchy vegetables than the people in Idaho.
  • There are only a few places in the world where a bounty of star garnets can be found. One is in India and the other happens to be in Idaho. The Emerald Creek Garnet Area provides opportunities for harvesting star garnets. A permit is issued for visitors who wish to dig.
  • Many states are working toward being more eco-friendly, but it seems that Idaho is moving quickly. The state’s Capital Building is the only state capital that is kept warm using a renewable source of energy. It is called geothermal water, which means the hot water that sits 3,000 feet underground is used to produce heat.
  • Women should be pretty proud of Idaho as it is the only state seal in the United States that was designed by a woman. The woman was Emma Edwards Green, and her design was chosen in 1891.
  • Idaho may be known for its crops or gems, but one thing that horror lovers like about the state are the ghost towns. Silver City and the Burke are some of the most known ghost towns, but there are many others.
  • It might sound a little strange, but it is against the law for a man to give his beloved a box of sweets that weighs more than 50 pounds.
  • People really love to smile in Pocatello, Idaho. This obsession with smiles went so far that it became a law. Yes, it is illegal not to smile in public in this little region of the state.
  • It is illegal for a person to fish while they are riding the back of a camel. Take that camel-riding fisherman.
  • A person cannot sweep dirt from his or her house into the street. This is a law in Eagle, Idaho where cleanliness is definitely valued by the people in the city.
  • Idaho’s State Penitentiary is known as a haunted location. Talk about a double-whammy for those who might commit a crime.
  • Heaven’s Gate Lookout, in Idaho, is a location where you can see Washington, Montana, and even Oregon.
  • This state offers the longest gondola ride in the world, so strap in and enjoy nature from above. The gondola is in the Silver Mountain Resort in Kellogg.
  • Someone paid $600,000 for a bull from Idaho. This was the most expensive bull ever sold. The cost was high because the Hereford bull weighed 1,410, and its lineage was impeccable.
  • The Lake Coeur d’Alene boardwalk is 3,300 feet long and is known as the longest boardwalk in the world. This is definitely for all those who love to walk by the beach.
  • Idaho is home to the Niagara of the West. Yes, those who want to experience something like Niagara Falls could check out Shoshone Falls with its 212-foot drop.
  • Those interested in birds of prey will be happy to know that Idaho has an awesome wildlife preserve, which is known for its dense population of falcons, eagles, and hawks.
  • If you are interested in old churches, you may want to visit the Rathdrum. This city holds the state’s oldest brick church called the Saint Stanislaus Church.
  • North America has a lot of ski resorts, but it seems that Idaho beat other states to the punch. The first ski destination in the United States is Idaho’s State Valley.The state’s fruit is the Huckleberry, which makes sense because Huckleberry tea is good for starch digestion. Potatoes, the most popular vegetable in the state, are full of starch.
  • The state’s motto is “Esto Perpetua,” which means “this is forever.”
  • 13 is a very special number for this state. It is special because it is the 13th largest state (in terms of land area) in America.
  • Idaho might not like the idea of private land. This is evident because a whopping 63 percent of the state is considered public land.
  • Idaho may be known for potatoes, but it should be known for its trout, too. It is estimated that 85 percent of all the commercial trout sold in America comes from Hagerman Valley.
  • Evil Knievel tried to jump over the Twin Falls in 1974. He failed, but those interested in seeing the failed jump can check out the Twin Falls.
  • The word “potato” was first used in the state’s license plate back in 1928, and the state has not looked back since.
  • One of the most celebrated winter celebrations called the Winter Carnival in McCall began in 1924. It actually started because the locals were bored.
  • There are about 4,522,506 acres of wild land in Idaho. Yes, this means there are no roads here.
  • A City That Owes Its name to Snake River and Railroad: Idaho Falls attributes its name to a waterfall along the Snake River, a key feature of agriculture in the state of Idaho. The surrounding communities have re-created waterfalls that had been destroyed in the process of developing the area.
  • Twin Falls was Discovered by Rafters: Twin Falls city may have been founded by the irrigation wizardly godfather- I.B. Perrine when he built the Milner Dam. But the city was actually discovered in 1811 by a group of rafters led by Wilson price Hunt. After a year’s expedition from Saint Louis to Oregon, his trip with the group stopped when they hit the rapids on Snake River.
  • World’s Silver Capital: for a long time, Wallace has been regarded as the silver capital. Most of the silver mining comes from Shoshone County. The activity is conducted in the most environmentally-friendly way to conserve the pristine mountains where recreational enthusiasts flock.
  • The Cataldo mission is the oldest building in the state.
  • American Falls is unique from most communities because the entire town was moved in the mid-1920s when the original American Falls Dam was constructed.
  • Rexburg is home to Ricks College, the largest private two-year college in the nation.
  • Elk River is the home of the Idaho Champion Western Red Cedar Tree, the largest tree in the state. Estimated to be over 3000 years old this giant is more than 18 feet in diameter and stands 177 feet tall.
  • Albertson College of Idaho in Caldwell was founded as the College of Idaho in 1891 and is the state’s oldest four-year institution of higher learning.
  • Perched at 9,500 feet on Trinity Mountain is the highest fire lookout in the Boise National Forest.
  • In Idaho law forbids a citizen to give another citizen a box of candy that weighs more than 50 pounds.
  • The city of Grace in the Gem Valley is most famous for their certified seed potatoes.
  • Blackfoot is home of the Eastern Idaho State Fair.
  • The Dworshak Reservoir is over 50 miles long. The Dworshak Dam is in Orofino.
  • At 5897 feet elevation, Mackay calls itself the Top of Idaho because it is the nearest city to Mt. Borah, the highest mountain in Idaho.
  • Soda Springs boasts the largest man-made geyser in the world.
  • Lewiston is located at the confluence of the Snake and Clearwater Rivers. The elevation is 738 feet above sea level.
  • The Treasure Valley area around Nampa is known as Idaho’s Banana Belt.
  • During the 1860s an Oregon Shoreline Railroad base camp called Boomerang was constructed in Payette.
  • Rigby is known as the birthplace of television since it is Philo T. Farnsworth’s hometown. Farnsworth pioneered television technology.
  • Under Idaho law only two forms of city government are allowed: a mayor/councilor or a council/manager form.
  • Shelley has been the home of the Idaho Annual Spud Day since 1927.
  • Sun Valley is recognized as the home of America’s first destination ski resort.
  • Sawtooth Mountain/Sawtooth National Recreational Area was named for its jagged profile.
  • Anderson Dam is known for its blue-ribbon fly-fishing.
  • Idaho’s first territorial prison was opened in 1872. It was placed on the National Register of Historic Places. It was converted into a public facility after the last prisoners were removed in 1974.
  • Seven Devils’ Peaks, one of the highest mountain ranges in Idaho, Includes Heaven’s Gate Lookout, where sightseers can look into four states.
  • People outside of Idaho eat more Idaho potatoes than the people in Idaho.
  • Idaho grows one third of America’s potatoes, which totals to about 27 billion starchy vegetables annually.
  • Along with potatoes, Idaho is also the top producer of lentils. Moscow (Idaho, not Russia) is part of the Palouse region known as The Lentil Capital Of the World.
  • Ernest Hemingway came to Idaho in 1939 in hopes that the open air and mountain life would help inspire him to write his famous novel, “For Whom The Bell Tolls.”
  • A picture of Ernest Hemingway kicking a beer can on a street in Idaho was said to have been his favorite picture of himself.
  • When you get to Heaven’s Gate Lookout, you can see four states at one time: Idaho, Washington, Montana and Oregon.
  • The grocery store chain Albertsons was founded by Idaho native and supermarket pioneer, Joseph Albertson.
  • Evel Knievel’s Snake Jump Monument commemorates the daredevil’s failed attempt to jump the Snake Canyon on a rocket cycle in 1974.
  • Hailey, Idaho is where Bruce Willis and Demi Moore moved to in order to raise their children out of the Hollywood eye, back when they were still married.
  • New Plymouth is the world’s largest horseshoe-shaped town.
  • The Church River Of No Return Wilderness has the most wilderness in the lower 48 states with 2.3 million acres of backcountry (and probably the coolest name).
  • The potato first appeared on an Idaho license plate in 1928. Today, you can identify where most people are from in Idaho based on their Idaho license plate.
  • 'Esto Perpetua' is the Idahoan motto, it means "let it be perpetual", or "it is forever".
  • Archaeologists recently discovered a blade-like tool made of rock in Idaho. It turns out this tool is 13,500 years old! This is definitive proof that humans have lived in Idaho for thousands of years longer than previously believed.
  • Before Europeans arrived, there were around 8,000 Indigenous Americans living on the land that is now known as Idaho.  
  • The Coeur d Alene, Kootenai, Nez Perce, Shoshone-Paiute and Shoshone-Bannock tribes still live in Idaho today.
  • From 1900 to 1920 a huge number of Basque immigrants from the Pyrenees came to Idaho to find work as sheepherders. The city of Boise currently has the largest Basque community in the United States.
  • The Appaloosa horse is Idaho's state animal. The breed was originally brought over by the Spanish. The Nez Perce tribe embraced the horse and it became entwined in the culture of the area.
  • The Mountain Bluebird is the state bird of Idaho, it can be spotted on many of Idaho's famous hiking trails.
  • Boise is the state capital and largest Idaho city, with a population of 190,000 people.
  • Idaho is the 14th largest state in the United States. The total area covers 216,900 square kilometres.
  • The Idaho state population currently stands at 1.787 million.
  • There are more miles of river in Idaho than any other state, 3100 miles to be precise!
  • At an amazing 2.3 million acres, The Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness Area is the largest contiguous area of protected wilderness in the United States.
  • As well as gems, the mountains of Idaho also contain veins of gold, silver, lead, zinc, cobalt, copper, and lots of other rare minerals.
  • Idaho is split into two time zones. The majority of Idaho is in the Mountain Time Zone, while the area above the Salmon River is part of the Pacific Time Zone.
  • Have you ever heard of the Smurf Turf? The Idaho Boise State University Broncos play on a blue football field, the only one in the world.
  • The State Capitol Building in Idaho is heated by hot springs located 3,000 feet down in the ground below.
  • In Idaho there is a law in place forbidding anyone to give the gift of a box of candy that weighs more than fifty pounds.
  • In the late 19th century, the Bear Lake Monster was first spotted, this was rumored to be a serpent like beast that was over ninety feet long!
  • Idaho often comes out on top in polls of the most boring states, which seems unfair based on all these amazing facts about the place!
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