160 Amazing Facts About Libya


Libya flag

160 Interesting Facts About Libya

  • The official language is Arabic.
  • Libya is a country located in North Africa.
  • The official name of the country is Libya.
  • The population density is 3.6 people / km2.
  • The main religion is Islam, 96%.
  • The Libyan dinar is the national currency.
  • The average age of people living in this country is 28 years old.
  • In this country, about 114 000 children are born each year (1.8% of the population), and about 22 700 people die (0.4% of the population).
  • 155 people out of 1000 possess firearms.
  • 86% of the country’s population lives in urban areas.
  • In this country an adult person smokes an average of 68 cigarettes a month.
  • The average life expectancy in this country is 76.1 years (women – 77.8 years and men – 75.4 years).
  • Men and women can retire at the age of 65.
  • In this country, the amount of income tax for individuals is 10%, and for companies 20% (2018).
  • All citizens have access to doctors, hospitals, clinics and medicines for free.
  • The work week is 40 hours.
  • The lowest located place in the country is Sabchat Ghuzajjil – 47 m.p.p.
  • The most deadly disease in this country is heart failure.
  • The highest peak is Bikku Bitti 2267 m above sea level.
  • The highest situated city in the country is Gharyan.
  • The lowest temperature: -9 °C was measured in Hon.
  • The highest temperature: 50.2 °C was measured in Zuwara.
  • In Libya, on average, an adult consumes about 0.1 liters of pure alcohol per year.
  • In 2013, 4,398 people lost their lives as a result of traffic accidents.
  • Men and women can retire at the age of 65.
  • 5% of the population suffer from malnourishment (around 310,000 people).
  • The average IQ level is 83.
  • 28% of adults living in this country are overweight.
  • On average, a woman gives birth to 2.1 children.
  • In this country, men and women can get married at the age of 21.
  • The last death penalty was carried out in 2010.
  • In this country, compulsory education lasts 9 years.
  • The beginning of education begins at the age of 6.
  • The average IQ level is 83.
  • In this country there are 9% of people above 15 years of age who can not read or write (approximately 565 020 people).
  • The minimum wage is 450 dinars per month (data from 2011).
  • Men and women can retire at the age of 65.
  • The unemployment rate in 2018 is 17.7% .
  • In this country, the amount of income tax for individuals is 10%, and for companies 20% (2018).
  • In this country over 2,400,000 (2015) 3,800,000 (2018) people have access to internet (about 60% of the population).
  • Around 2 250,000 (2015) 3 500 000 (2018) accounts on Facebook.
  • All the desert tribes collectively are known as the Bedouins. They lead nomadic lives, moving with their livestock or settling in farming villages in oases. The Tuaregs were the original desert traders who transported goods by camels across the desert. With robes dyed with indigo, they are sometimes called the Blue People.
  • Libya’s national language is Arabic but the people also speak Italian and English.
  • Libyans are warm and welcoming people. When greeting another, they shake hands and maintain the handshake as long as the verbal greeting is on-going. Men shake with men, but wait for women to initiate a handshake from woman to man.
  • There are about 140 tribes and clans in Libya.
  • About 97% of the population in Libya are Muslims, most of whom belong to the Sunni branch.
  • Libyan cuisine derives much from the traditions of Mediterranean, North African, and Berber cuisines. There are four main ingredients of traditional Libyan food: olives (and olive oil), dates, grains and milk. One of the most popular Libyan dishes is Bazin, an unleavened bread prepared with barley, water and salt.
  • As with most of the African countries, Libya has an ongoing love affair with football.
  • The hottest temperature ever recorded on Earth’s surface was 57.8°C (136°F) in El Azizia, Libya recorded in 1922.
  • Libya has 1,770 kilometers (1,100 miles) of coastline.
  • Within Africa, Libya has the longest Mediterranean coastline, and is home to many beaches.
  • Cyrene was an ancient Greek and Roman city near present-day Shahhat, Libya. It was the oldest and most important of the five Greek cities in the region. It gave eastern Libya the classical name Cyrenaica that it has retained to modern times. Since 1982, it has been a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Leptis Magna was enlarged and embellished by Septimius Severus, who was born there and later became emperor. It was one of the most beautiful cities of the Roman Empire, with its imposing public monuments, harbour, market-place, storehouses, shops and residential districts. Since 1982, it has been a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The country has 146 airports, 68 of the paved surface.
  • There are 10 known terrorist organizations in Lebanon.
  • The average temperature is 11 ° C in January and 31 ° C in July.
  • The lowest located place in the country is Sabchat Ghuzajjil – 47 m.p.p.
  • The country is 5.6 times bigger than Poland.
  • Libya borders with such countries as: Algeria 982 km, Chad 1 055 km, Egypt 1 115 km, Niger 354 km, Sudan 383 km, Tunisia 459 km.
  • There are no rivers in this country.
  • Over 90% of the country is occupied by deserts.
  • The highest peak is Bikku Bitti 2267 m above sea level.
  • In Libya there are 15.55 km2 of agricultural land (9% of the country’s area).
  • The highest situated city in the country is Gharyan.
  • 2170 sq km of land is covered by forests (0.1%)
  • The nearest capital in a straight line from Tripoli is Valletta (Malta) – 355 km.
  • The furthest capital city in a straight line from Tripoli is Nukuʻalofa (Tonga) – 18467 km.
  • The minimum wage is 450 dinars per month (data from 2011).
  • In this country, the amount of income tax for individuals is 10%, and for companies 20% (2018).
  • The level of inflation in 2018 is 12.1%.
  • Tripoli is the capital and largest city of Libya, as well as the Port of Tripoli.
  • Tripoli is also the capital for most international businesses in the country as well.
  • Tripoli is a Greek word that means “three cities”. The Arabic name for it is Tarabulus. It is located on the edge of the desert on a point of rocky land that projects out into the Mediterranean, forming a small bay.
  • Tripoli is also known as the Mermaid of the Mediterranean for its turquoise waters and whitewashed buildings.
  • Tripoli’s old town, the Medina, still has much of its old world look. Tourists will find the Red Castle Museum here, with its vast palace complex and numerous courtyards, on the outskirts of the Medina. Here also is the Traveler’s Library.
  • During the latter years of Gaddafi’s regime, the country’s full official name was the “Great Socialist People’s Libyan Arab Jamahiriya”.
  • Although an Islamic nation today, Libya was an early Christian center historically.
  • Currently at least two political groups have set up governments for Libya, but only one of them is recognized as legitimate by the rest of the world. The fighting and instability in the country/region was responsible for the deaths of almost 1,800 migrants fleeing several countries in North Africa. They died trying to cross the Mediterranean Sea to Europe in the summer of 2015.
  • Libya’s 1,770 kilometers (1099 miles) of Mediterranean Sea coast is the longest of any North African country.
  • The area of the Mediterranean Sea north of Libya is frequently called the Libyan Sea.
  • North of the mountains of Jebel Uweinat the Libyan plain is dotted with eroded volcanic features. This area also contains the Arkenu structures, thought at one time to be two meteorite impact craters.
  • When oil was discovered in the 1950s, an enormous aquifer underneath much of Libya was also found. This aquifer’s water pre-dates the last ice ages.
  • Besides revues from oil exports; petrochemicals, iron, aluminum, and steel manufacturing accounts for 20 percent of Libya’s GDP.
  • Libya’s poor soils and climatic conditions severely limit how much food can be grown within the country, so it imports about 75 percent of its population’s food.
  • Bikku Bitti, also known as Bette Peak, is the highest mountain in Libya at 2,266 meters (7,434 ft). It is located on the Dohone spur of the Tibesti Mountains in southern Libya, near the Chadian border.
  • South of Libya’s narrow coastal strip is a sparse grassland giving way to the Sahara Desert – a vast, unfertile wasteland that supports a very small percentage of people and agriculture.
  • The Mediterranean coast and the Sahara Desert are Libya’s most prominent natural features.
  • A Phoenician trading-post that served as an outlet for the products of the African hinterland, Sabratha was part of the short-lived Numidian Kingdom of Massinissa before being Romanized and rebuilt in the 2nd and 3rd centuries A.D. Since 1982, it has been a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Arch of Marcus Aurelius is a Roman triumphal arch in the city of Oea, modern Tripoli, where it is found near the northeastern entrance to the Medina. It is a quadrifrons trumphal arch, surmounted by an unusual octagonal cupola,and was erected (entirely in marble) by Gaius Calpurnius Celsus, quinquennial duumvir of the city, to commemorate the victories of Lucius Verus, junior colleague and adoptive brother of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius, over the Parthians in the Roman–Parthian War of 161–66.
  • Ghadamès, known as ‘the pearl of the desert’, stands in an oasis. It is one of the oldest pre-Saharan cities and an outstanding example of a traditional settlement. Its domestic architecture is characterized by a vertical division of functions: the ground floor used to store supplies; then another floor for the family, overhanging covered alleys that create what is almost an underground network of passageways; and, at the top, open-air terraces reserved for the women. The old part of the town, which is surrounded by a city wall, has been declared a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1986.
  • Tadrart Acacus also known as the Acacus Mountains is a mountain run in Ghat, Libya. It structures some piece of the Saharan Desert. There are many hole compositions and rock craft in the region, made in different styles. The area was inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1985 because of the importance of these paintings and carvings. The paintings date from 12,000 B.C. to 100 A.D. and reflect cultural and natural changes in the area. There are paintings and carvings of animals such as giraffes, elephants, ostriches and camels, but also of men and horses. People are depicted in various daily life situations, for example while making music and dancing.
  • The biggest meal of the day for Libyan families is lunch and it is of great symbolic importance. Businesses, shops, and schools close for several hours so families may gather together to eat.
  • The people drink green tea after they eat to aid digestion. Tea and coffee are favorite beverages. Libyan tea is thick and like black syrup.
  • The cuisine of Libya is a mixture of Mediterranean, African and Italian influences. Common ingredients include dates, olives, fruits, lamb, chicken, milk, and grains, particularly couscous. Stuffed sweet peppers appear in many meals. The proper use of spices is important to achieve the right mix of popular flavors.
  • All meats eaten by Libyans must be halal. This means the animal was killed humanely and prayed over ritually according to Muslim customs.
  • Food is eaten with three fingers on the right hand. The left is considered unclean. Good manners dictate you leave a little food on your plate to indicate that your host is a gracious and generous provider.
  • 1.6% of fatal accidents were caused by people under the influence of alcohol.
  • This country has more than 3,5553,000 motor vehicles (566 vehicles per 1,000 inhabitants).
  • The top-level national domain is .ly . There are over 11,800 websites with this extension.
  • The most popular pages with the extension .ly are: adf.ly, google.com.ly and ow.ly.
  • In this country there are over 100 024 km of paved roads (0,16% of all roads in the world).
  • At the beginning of 2015 , foreign debt was around: $ 5,244,000 .
  • The country has over $105,000,000,000 in foreign exchange reserves (0.89% of foreign currency reserves of all countries in the world).
  • Libya has 116600 kg of gold reserves (2018).
  • The built-up speed limit is 50 km / h.
  • In addition to built-up areas, the permitted speed on an ordinary road is 85 km / h, and on highways 100 km / h.
  • Zero tolerance for drivers driving a car “by glass”. You must have 0.0 promil.
  • Tripoli, the capital of Libya, was in a position to help protect American ships from attack by Barbary pirates in the 19th century (since, after all, some of them were based there!) By paying protection to the Sultan, the U.S. ships sailed the Mediterranean unmolested. When the price went up, the two countries went to war, twice, in what came to be known as the Barbary Wars.
  • In Libya’s entire history, it only had one King. King Idris reigned from 1951 until he was overthrown by Colonel Gaddafi (also spelled Qadhafi) in 1969.
  • Much of the central and eastern area of the country is covered by the Libyan Desert. The Libyan Desert is one of the most sun-baked and arid places on earth. There is no average rainfall — the land may go for decades with no rain and the highlands for five to ten years without it.
  • Libya is home to the largest proven oil reserves on the African continent. It makes a major contribution to the world’s supply of sweet, light crude.
  • Although the World Bank names the country as an “Upper Middle Income Economy”, after years of political unrest Libya’s unemployment rate is 21 percent and the money from their oil is not benefiting the majority of its people.
  • The majority of the Libyan population lives in its coastal area cities. Traditional tribal society life is the norm in the Berber villages of western Libya. In the south, you will find the Bedouins, including the Tuaregs.
  • Libyan people traditionally lived in extended families. Today many young couples get their own place instead of living with the husband’s family. The couples even choose their own mates, particularly those who live in the cities. In rural areas, traditional arranged marriages still occur.
  • The Berbers identify themselves with their village or tribe before their country.
  • Libyans greet one another with “Salaam aleikum: (Peace be with you.) or “Sabbahakum Allah bi’l-khair” (May Allah give you a good morning.). They also ask a set of formal ritual questions about their families and health.
  • Libya is an Islamic country so women still wear the Hijab to cover their head according to Islamic law. Many women, though, especially in the cities, no longer wear public veils and dress in western style dresses and clothing. So do men. Traditional men and women still wear their traditional robes.
  • Popular sports are soccer, chariot races, and camel racing.
  • Saving face is important to Libyans, who are non-confrontational. They avoid disagreeing or saying no.
  • It is bordered by the Mediterranean Sea to the north, Egypt to the east, Sudan to the southeast, Chad and Niger to the south and Algeria and Tunisia to the west.
  • As of 1 January 2017, the population of Libya was estimated to be 6,273,726 people.
  • One of the most spectacular sights in Libya is Tripoli’s massive Red Castle, set on an island adjacent to the shore. Built in the 16th century on the site of a Roman military encampment, it was the seat of power for Ottoman conquerors. The magnificent fortress also holds one of Libya’s finest museums, although renovations are presently taking place, so some of the galleries are closed
  • Libya has been inhabited by Berbers since the late Bronze Age. The Phoenicians established trading posts in western Libya, and ancient Greek colonists established city-states in eastern Libya. Libya was variously ruled by Carthaginians, Persians, Egyptians and Greeks before becoming a part of the Roman Empire. Libya was an early centre of Christianity. After the fall of the Western Roman Empire, the area of Libya was mostly occupied by the Vandals until the 7th century, when invasions brought Islam and Arab colonisation. In the 16th century, the Spanish Empire and the Knights of St John occupied Tripoli, until Ottoman rule began in 1551. Libya was involved in the Barbary Wars of the 18th and 19th centuries. Ottoman rule continued until the Italian occupation of Libya resulted in the temporary Italian Libya colony from 1911 to 1943.
  • In 1949, the UN voted that Libya should become independent, and in 1951 it became the UnitedKingdom of Libya.
  • Col Gaddafi seized power in 1969 and ruled for four decades until he was toppled in 2011 following an armed rebellion assisted by Western military intervention.
  • The Economy of Libya depends primarily upon revenues from the petroleum sector, which contributes practically all export earnings and 80% of GDP. These oil revenues and a small population have given Libya the highest nominal per capita GDP in Africa.
  • Libya is a large country with a relatively small population, and the population is concentrated very narrowly along the coast.
  • Ninety percent of the people live in less than 10% of the area, primarily along the coast.
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