200 Facts About Vermont- Things you Don't Know About Vermont


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200 Facts About Vermont- Things you Don't Know About Vermont

  • Vermont is known for its forested landscape.
  • The population of Vermont is only 624,000.
  • Vermont's state animal is the Morgan horse.
  • The state capital of Vermont is Montpelier.
  • A few other important cities in Vermont are Burlington, Essex Junction and Rutland.
  • Vermont is the country’s leading producer of maple syrup.
  • The state of Vermont is only 9,616 square miles in size.
  • It is one of the smallest states in the U.S. and has one of the lowest populations.
  • Vermont's name comes from the French phrase “vert mont,” meaning “green mountain.” 
  • Vermont became the 14th state in 1791; it was the first admitted after the thirteen colonies.
  • Before that, it was its very own country. Founded in 1777, the Vermont Republic operated a post office, issued its own currency called Vermont coppers, and abolished slavery.
  • The Vermont state flower and bird are the red clover and the hermit thrush.
  • Vermont is a popular holiday destination because of the many national parks and ski resorts in the state.
  • The lowest point in Vermont is Lake Champlain  which is 95 feet above sea level.
  • Billboards are illegal in the state of Vermont and advertising along roadways is highly regulated. You won’t see exit signs plastered with McDonalds or Starbucks logos, and even the signs for a company’s place of business on their own premises have to follow strict guidelines. 
  • The first exception to Vermont’s no-billboards rule came when a hand painted mural advertising downtown Bellows Falls was allowed in 2008. This opened up the possibility for advertising as long as the signs are hand painted murals meant to support and endorse a downtown district.
  • Vermont was the first state to sign into the Union after the first 13 states in 1791 and it was one of the first of all the states to strictly prohibit slavery in its constitution.
  • Vermont is one of only two states in America to offer snowboarding as a varsity sport that comes with a state championship. 
  • Unquestionably Vermont’s most popular tourist attraction for children, Ben & Jerry’s factory tour is a favorite experience for adults, too. On the 30-minute guided tour of the factory, you’ll watch workers as they make and package ice cream, while a guide explains the process. On days when the factory is not operating, you’ll still see inside it, but a movie will show it in action.
  • Restored historic buildings and the collections they house at Shelburne Museum reflect Vermont’s rich history and America’s folk and fine art traditions. You can explore a round barn; the lake steamer SS Ticonderoga (now on dry land); a lake lighthouse; a barn filled with vintage carriages and wagons; a print shop; and collections of carved decoys, American quilts, handmade hatboxes, hooked rugs, and trains, in a bucolic village setting among manicured gardens.
  • Montpelier, Is the largest producer of maple syrup in the U.S.
  • Vermont’s largest employer isn’t Ben and Jerry’s, it’s IBM.
  • Until recently, the only way a Vermonter could get a drivers license with their photo on it was to drive to Montpelier.
  • Vermont was, at various times, claimed by both New Hampshire and New York.
  • Until 1996, Vermont was the only state without a Wal-Mart.
  • Ben & Jerry’s Ice Cream company gives their ice cream waste to the local Vermont farmers who use it to feed their hogs. The hogs seem to like all of the flavors except Mint Oreo.
  • Rudyard Kipling, living in Vermont in the 1890’s invented the game of snow golf.
  • The ice cream waste from the Ben & Jerry's factory is donated to local farmers who use it to feed their pigs.
  • The pigs apparently don't like the mint choc chip ice cream flavour!
  • The largest ever outdoor astronomy lesson was held in August 2018 in the Fairbanks Museum and Planetarium in Vermont
  • The sport of ski golf was invented in Dummerston, Vermont by Rudyard Kipling (the author of 'The Jungle Book').
  • A farmer called Wilson Bentley from Vermont invented a technique that meant you could take a photograph of a snowflake.
  • A local to the state created the first snowboard. This development even changed the name of the sport, from snurfing to snowboarding!
  • The Ethan Allen furniture chain was named after the revolutionary leader from Vermont.
  • In 2011 there was a parade of Cadillac cars in Barton, Vermont to honor the founder who was born there.
  • IBM is Vermont’s largest employer. The company employs just under 400,000 people worldwide and brought in a staggering $95.8 billion worth of revenue in 2009.
  • Forget diversity. In 2010, Vermont was listed as the second whitest state in the country.
  • There are now more trees in Vermont than there was since 1859, back when Vermont was mostly farmland. 
  • Lake Champlain run along almost the entire length of the border between Vermont and New York and is the sixth-largest interior body of water in the country. Only the five Great Lakes are bigger. 
  • In March of 1998, President Bill Clinton signed a bill that officially made Lake Champlain the sixth Great Lake, an action that was pursued by Senator Patrick Leahy. However, that status was rescinded just a few weeks later.
  • All the single ladies might find it difficult to bring sexy back, since every woman technically needs written permission of their fathers to wear false teeth. There are no other top 40 hits to explain this law, which might be why no one really cares. 
  • Vermont’s state capitol building is one of very few capitals to be adorned by a gold dome. A statue of Ceres sits on top. 
  • The Vermont Teddy Bear Company is headquartered in Vermont. As one of the largest producers of teddy bears by mail order and internet, the company creates each bear by hand and produces over almost 150,000 per year for delivery. 
  • The Vermont Teddy Bear Company struck quite a nerve in 2005 when it unveiled its “Crazy For You” bear, which came dressed in a white straight jacket embroidered with a red heart and came issued with “commitment papers.” 
  • In 2009, there were a whopping 543 organic farms in the tiny state of Vermont. 
  • U.S. Presidents Chester A. Arthur and Calvin Coolidge were both born in Vermont. The latter is the only president born on the Fourth of July.
  • The Von Trapp family that inspired The Sound of Music moved to Stowe, Vermont in 1942. Descendants are still running the family ski lodge—and, we hope, spontaneously bursting into song.
  • Lake Champlain, located primarily in Vermont with parts in New York and Quebec, isn't as big as the Great Lakes, but it does have its own monster—or so the legend goes. Champ is said to be friendly, 20 to 80 feet long, and have a head like either a snake or a dog. The most famous photo of him was taken back in 1977.
  • Vermont can be divided into six geographical land regions; the Northeast Highlands, the Western New England Upland, the Green Mountains, the Vermont Valley, the Taconic Mountains, and the Champlain Valley.
  • The famous Green Mountains cover most of the Green Mountain region in central Vermont. The Green Mountains support the tallest mountains in Vermont – Mount Mansfield, at 1,340 meters (4,395 feet) above sea level.
  • The mean elevation of the state of Vermont is 305 meters (1,000 feet) above sea level.
  • Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park is a United States National Historical Park in Woodstock, Vermont. The only National Park to concentrate on land stewardship in America incorporates both a working farm and a Victorian mansion on the hill above, set in formal gardens designed by several foremost landscape architects. Both rail magnate Frederick Billings, and later, the Rockefellers were dedicated to land conservation and used this property to put it into practice.
  • President of the United States, Calvin Coolidge, was from Vermont.
  • Calvin Coolidge is not the only president from Vermont, President Chester A. Arthur was also from the state.
  • Both Presidents were Vice Presidents who became Presidents when the sitting Presidents died.
  • Calvin Coolidge was the only President ever to be born on Independence Day.
  • In 1903, Dr. Horatio Nelson Jackson from Burlington, Vermont was the first person to drive across the U.S.
  • The car that Dr. Horatio Nelson Jackson used was nicknamed after Vermont.
  • The singer JoJo was from Vermont.
  • Inventor John Deere was also born in the state.
  • The headquarters of tasty ice cream brand Ben & Jerry's is in Waterbury, Vermont.
  • A crazy law in Vermont is that any woman must get permission from her husband if she wants to wear false teeth. It even needs to be written permission!
  • The state capital of Vermont, Montpelier is the smallest capital city in the entire United States.
  • Before the Constitution, Vermont used a currency called the Vermont Copper.
  • The only state with a smaller population than Vermont is Wyoming.
  • Vermont produces over 500,000 gallons of maple syrup a year.
  • Vermont has a very large ratio of dairy cows to people.
  • At one point there were more cows than people in the state.
  • Lots of local people in Vermont consider themselves to be a producer of maple syrup from their home.
  • The Vermont state tree is the sugar maple tree. No prizes for guessing that one, all the maple syrup has to come from somewhere!
  • Green Mountain National Forest lies in two sections along the mountain chain that forms the state’s spine – and makes east-west travel a challenge. Nearly every route across these mountains leads over a gap, a mountain pass that may be good for viewing the scenery, but not so good for winter travel. In fact, some of these roads close entirely during the winter. But follow them the rest of the year to discover waterfalls, National Forest campgrounds, scenic places to picnic, trails to hike, and a world of nature.
  • Vermont is number one for skiing and snowboarding in New England and the East! As a winter destination with something for skiers and snowboarders of all levels, Vermont is hard to beat: think fresh powder, picturesque peaks, and more maple syrup than you can handle.
  • For thousands of years indigenous peoples, including the Mohawk and the Algonquian-speaking Abenaki, occupied much of the territory that is now Vermont and was later claimed by France’s colony of New France. France ceded the territory to Great Britain after being defeated in 1763 in the Seven Years’ War.
  • Vermont was admitted to the United States as the fourteenth state in 1791 after a brief period of sovereignty following the American Revolutionary War.
  • Vermont takes a lot of pride in playing a crucial role in the history of snowboarding when former ski racer, Jake Burton, revolutionized the industry with designs that changed the face of the sport. Burton started off as a tiny snowboarding company based out of South Londonerry, but quickly exploded into the biggest snowboarding brand in the world.
  • Burton designed the uniforms for the 2014 USA Olympic Snowboarding Team. 
  • Brattleboro resident Ida May Fuller was the first American citizen to receive a Social Security check. She collected her first check in 1940 and lived to be 100 years old. 
  • It is bordered by Massachusetts to the south, New Hampshire to the east, New York to the west, and the Canadian province of Quebec to the north.
  • As of January 2019, the population of Vermont was estimated to be about 625,000 people. It is the 49th most populous state in the United States.
  • Vermont is the 45th largest state in the United States in terms of total area with 24,923 square kilometers (9,616 square miles).
  • Montpelier is the capital of Vermont. It is the least populous state capital in the United States with population of about 8,000 people; however, the daytime population grows to about 21,000, due to the large number of jobs within city limits.
  • The band Phish are a Vermont-based band with a huge following. Guitarist Trey Anastasio is a Vermont boy, born and bred. 
  • A long-since dead law states that Vermont residents are strictly prohibited from denying the existence of God. Maybe that’s why Vermonter Ethan Allen printed his own version of the Bible.
  • Everybody’s favorite ice cream-loving, hippie duo, Ben & Jerry’s, began right here in Vermont by Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield. They were two childhood friends from New York who turned their ice cream dream into a reality in Burlington on May 5, 1978 with $12,000.
  • The interior walls of the Ben and Jerry's Burlington offices are round. 
  • Ben & Jerry’s employees get three free pints of their beloved ice cream per day, every single day. Do the math and that’s a lot of Chubby Hubby. To offset the chub part, though, Ben & Jerry’s also provides health club memberships to their employees. 
  • What started as an online site to commemorate Ben & Jerry’s flavors is now a real cemetery of sorts. The Flavor Graveyard is located at the company’s headquarters. There, you will find headstones to dozens of flavors like Holy Cannoli.
  • Ben & Jerry’s is known for giving their ice cream waste to local farmers to feed their hogs. The hogs reportedly like all of the flavors, with the exception of Mint Oreo. 
  • Up until recently, the only way a Vermont driver could get their photo put on their license was to drive to a DMV in Montpelier. 
  • Famous brothers Groucho, Chicho and Harpo Marx used to vacation for the summers on Lake Bomoseen in Vermont.
  • Rudyard Kipling invented the game of snow golf in Vermont by painting his golf balls red so that they were easier to find in the snow. 
  • In case you’re wondering, it is illegal to whistle underwater in Vermont. Whoever put that one on the books forgot to mention that it’s also kind of impossible, which is probably why it’s an unenforced and forgotten law.
  • President Calvin Coolidge was born in Plymouth, and is the only president to be born on the fourth of July. Every year, a birthday celebration is held in his honor at his birthplace. 
  • If you’re happy and you know it, you must live in Vermont. The state consistently ranks in the top states for health, happiness and intelligence. In 2013, Vermonters were crowned the fifth happiest residents in the country, as well as put in the top five states for happiest Twitter users the same year. 
  • Brattleboro might pride themselves on leaning left, but even the most free spirit has their limits. The people of the town actually had to put laws against public nudity on the books in 2007, as a trend of people, mostly teens, staging hula hoop contests and bike races through downtown in nothing but their birthday suits became all the rage. 
  • Vermont made it all the way to 1996 as one of the only states to still not have a Wal-Mart. 
  • Some Hollywood claims to fame for Vermont include the filming of “Beetlejuice”, “Ethan Frome”, “The Spitfire Grill”, “Where The Rivers Flow North”, and “Baby Boom.”
  • More than three-quarters of Vermont is covered in forest. 
  • Vermont legends claim to have their own Loch Ness monster. Although the few photos that do exist of the creature have been largely debunked, the folklore of Vermont’s Champ derives mainly from eyewitness accounts, most of which occurred in the 1980s. 
  • The capital of Vermont, Montpelier, is the smallest state capital in the country, with a population of under 9,000 people. It is the only capital in the United States that doesn’t have a McDonald’s restaurant. 
  • At one time or another, the states of New Hampshire and New York both claimed Vermont as their own. 
  • The state of Vermont has more covered bridges per square mile than any other state in the country. 
  • In order to protect the dairy industry and discourage the use of margarine, it is considered illegal to use colored margarine in restaurants in Vermont unless the menu specially states that it is colored, in a font that is at least two inches high. 
  • Vermont was its very own independent country for 14 years before signing into the Union. 
  • Perhaps the most intricate and impressive maze comprised of maize is located in Danville, Vermont. It sits on 10 acres and the corn itself reaches 10 feet high. The maze can take hours to complete and usually does, unless you bail out on one of the emergency exits.
  • Vermont has almost one half of the dairy farms in all of New England. 
  • You probably know Vermont is famous for its maple syrup, but did you know the state produces more than 500,000 gallons every year? You're gonna need a lot of pancakes. 
  • Vermont was the first state admitted to the Union after the ratification of the Constitution.
  • With a population of fewer than nine thousand people, Montpelier, Vermont is the smallest state capital in the U.S.
  • Montpelier, Vermont is the only U.S. state capital without a McDonalds.
  • In ratio of cows to people, Vermont has the greatest number of dairy cows in the country.
  • Vermont does not sell alcohol to out of state licenses, you must have a liquor ID in order to purchase alcohol at liquor stores and grocery stores. This doesn’t apply to bars, but can affect those traveling through the state.
  • U.S. President Calvin Coolidge was the only president born on the fourth of July. Born in Plymouth 7/4/1872.
  • Vermont’s state capitol building is one of only a few to have a gold dome. Atop the dome is a statue of Ceres.
  • Consider this the next time you eat pancakes: It takes about 40 years for a sugar maple to grow large enough—at least 10 inches in diameter—to tap. Then it takes some 40 gallons of sap to produce a single gallon of syrup. Don't waste a drop! 
  • Vermont's also America's No. 1 producer of marble and No. 2 producer of talc. They're the state's official rock and mineral, respectively.
  • With a population of just 7,787 in 2012, Montpelier is the smallest state capital in the U.S. In comparison, Juneau, the capital of Alaska and the sixth smallest state capital by population, has 32,167 people.
  • Some people joke that Vermont has more dairy cows than people. Not true! It has one cow for every 3.8 people, which is still the nation's highest ratio of cows to people.
  • According to a 2013 Gallup poll, Vermont's the least religious state in the U.S. Only 22 percent of the respondents said they consider religion important and regularly attend religious services. On the flip side, Mississippi is the most religious state, with 61 percent of participants saying they attend services weekly or nearly every week.
  • It's also one of the most progressive states. It was the first to grant women partial voting rights (in 1880), abolish slavery (as a republic and a state), and legislate same-sex marriage.
  • One thing that's not legal in Vermont: billboard advertising. Vermont is one of four states to ban commercial billboards, the others being Maine, Hawaii, and Alaska.
  • Vermont has one telephone area code—and they're proud of it. You'll see 802 on t-shirts, bumper stickers, and even tattoos.
  • Vermont is a state in the New England region of the northeastern United States.
  • From north to south, Vermont is 256 kilometers (159 miles) long. Its greatest width, from east to west, is 143 kilometers (89 miles) at the Canada – US border; the narrowest width is 60 kilometers (37 miles) at the Massachusetts line.
  • Lake Champlain is a natural freshwater lake. The lake covering Vermont’s northwestern border with New York, is the largest lake in New England, and the sixth largest lake in the country. Lake Champlain drains nearly half of Vermont, and approximately 250,000 people get their drinking water from the lake.
  • Vermont experienced rising abolitionist sentiment and subsequently fought on the Union side of the American Civil War.
  • Montpelier, Vermont is the only US state capital without a McDonalds.
  • On May 5, 1978, Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield opened their first Ben & Jerry’s Homemade ice cream shop in a refurbished gas station in Burlington. In 2000, the infamous brand was acquired by Unilever for roughly $326 million in cash.
  • Some fun mountain names in Vermont include the Terrible Mountain, Vulture Mountain and Devils Gap. You definitely need to be brave to visit those!
  • Lake Champlain is one of the biggest bodies of water in the U.S.
  • The highest point in Vermont is Mansfield which is 4393 feet above sea level.
  • Because it's so green, Vermont is nicknamed the Green Mountain State.
  • The state is home to the world's largest underground quarry of marble.
  • There are more than a hundred different covered bridges in Vermont, which is more per square mile than any other part of the U.S.
  • It is one of the six New England states. The others are Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Hampshire, Massachusetts and Maine.
  • Vermont is the only state in New England that does not have any access to the Atlantic ocean.
  • The largest producer of maple syrup in the whole of the U.S. is Vermont.
  • There are absolutely no skyscrapers in the whole of the state.
  • You won't find any billboards in the entire state, because they have been banned.
  • The residents of Vermont were voted the fifth happiest state in the U.S. in 2013.
  • There is a myth that Lake Champlain has a friendly but shy monster in it.
  • Vermont was the last ever state to have a Walmart in the year 1996.
  • The world's largest ever grilled cheese sandwich was created by the Cabot Creamery from Vermont.
  • Another of its foodie claims to fame is that Vermont was home to the world's largest s'more which was 32 square feet wide. We wish we were there to taste it!
  • The first ever postage stamp in the U.S. was made in Brattleboro, Vermont in the year 1846.
  • The main industries that Vermont is known for are agriculture, energy, manufacturing, technology and the service industry.
  • It became the fourteenth state in the U.S. in the year 1791.
  • Before it became the fourteenth state, Vermont was an independent nation for 14 years.
  • Vermont was the first state to join the Union after the first thirteen colonies of the constitution.
  • When it was an independent nation, Vermont was able to create laws that completely banned slavery.
  • Vermont the state got its name in 1647 when the French explorer Samuel de Champlain drew it on a map, and named it Verd Mont which means "green mountain."
  • After a while, Verd Mont became known by its English name, Vermont.
  • The official song of Vermont used to be 'Moonlight', but in the '90s this was changed because it was too decided that it was difficult for people to sing.
  • Another funny law they have is that delivery men must walk backwards towards a house if the house is worth more than 500,000 dollars.
  • It is also illegal to keep a dove in your freezer in Vermont!
  • Another law in the town of Barre is that all residents of the town must bathe every Saturday night.
  • The state capital Montpelier is the only state capital without a McDonald's restaurant. This may be due to the small size of Montpelier and the fact that it is not a very car friendly city.
  • Alexander Twilight was the first African American ever to graduate from college in the United States. He was born in Vermont.
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