200 Special Facts About Coconut


Coconut

200 Special Facts About Coconut

  • Coconuts are a fruit consumed by humans.
  • The coconut palm is actually the national tree of The Maldives
  • In 2016 there were over 59 million tons of coconuts produced worldwide.
  • Coconut is a fruit that comes from the coconut tree.
  • The coconut tree is a member of the palm tree family.
  • The scientific name of the coconut tree is Cocos nucifera.
  • The coconut tree can grow up to 25 meters high.
  • The coconut botanically is a drupe, not a nut.
  • One 100 gram serving of coconut contains 354 calories.
  • The name coconut is actually a combination of nut and the Portuguese word coco.
  • Coconut grenades used to exist.
  • These weapons were used in World War II.
  • They were used by the Japanese.
  • Coconut water on average contains 94% water with around 46 calories a cup.
  • A coconut tree can have up to 180 coconuts harvested during a single harvest.
  • Coconuts, in different forms, are anti-viral, anti-fungal, anti-bacterial and anti-parasite.
  • In 2016 there were over 59 million tons of coconuts produced worldwide.
  • May 8th is the National Coconut Cream Pie Day.
  • The largest producers of coconuts are Indonesia, the Philippines, and India.
  • Falling coconuts kill 150 people every year – 10 times the number of people killed by sharks.
  • One 100 gram serving of coconut contains no cholesterol.
  • One 100 gram serving of coconut contains 20 milligrams of sodium.
  • One 100 gram serving of coconut contains 15 grams of carbohydrates.
  • One 100 gram serving of coconut contains 9 grams of dietary fiber.
  • One 100 gram serving of coconut contains 6 grams of sugar.
  • One 100 gram serving of coconut contains 3 grams of protein.
  • The natives of the Kiribati islands, who used woven coconut string to build their suits.
  • Coconuts, in different forms, are anti-viral, anti-fungal, anti-bacterial and anti-parasite.
  • The recommended daily amount of fiber an adult should have is 25grams.
  • The coconut palm is actually the national… tree of The Maldives.
  • In 2013 police in the Maldives took possession of a coconut.
  • The reason was that the police believed that it had been cursed with black magic.
  • In 2016 there were over 59 million tons of coconuts produced worldwide.
  • Falling coconuts are considered as an official cause of death.
  • The amount of deaths caused by falling coconuts is small.
  • Coconut water on average contains 94% water.
  • This water contains around 46 calories a cup.
  • The name coconut comes from coco, an old Portuguese and Spanish word that means “head” or “skull”.
  • Coconuts are harvested from coconut trees (Cocos nucifera) and its variants.
  • Coconuts trees are commercially grown in coconut plantations.
  • A coconut is not a nut, it’s botanically a drupe.
  • Humans have been using coconuts for thousands of years.
  • Coconuts are used as food and to make various manmade products.
  • According to FAOSTAT, the world produced over 68 million tons of coconuts in 2018.
  • According to FAOSTAT, the largest producer of coconuts in 2018 was Indonesia with over 20 million tons.
  • One 100 gram serving of coconut contains 33 grams of fat.
  • During World War 2, coconut water was also used to treat dehydration due to short medical supplies.
  • In 2011, Ho Eng Hui managed to pierce 4 coconuts in 12.15 seconds in Milan.
  • He set a world record.
  • A coconut tree can have up to 180 coconuts harvested during a single harvest.
  • The largest producers of coconuts are Indonesia, the Philippines, and India.
  • The coconut bra, famous for being a feature of the Hawaiian hula girl, is actually not native to Hawaii.
  • The garment is a western idea that is not an authentic Hawaiian item.
  • Researchers are investigating whether coconut husks can be used as a low-cost solution to building material in the Philippines.
  • There is a bar of famous chocolate with coconut filling named “Bounty”.
  • Coconut oil exists, and it is very famous amongst celebrities.
  • One 100 gram serving of coconut contains 356 milligrams of potassium.
  • One 100 gram serving of coconut contains the following Daily Values, 1% calcium, 5% vitamin C, 13% iron, 5% vitamin b-6 and 8% magnesium.
  • When the Portuguese sailors of Vasco da Gama first encountered the coconut, the hard shell reminded them of a skull and the mythical creature the Coco, hence the name coconut.
  • The National Geographic Society in 2011 showed that the coconut originated in India and Southeast Asia.
  • Literary evidence from the Ramayana and Sri Lankan chronicles indicate that the coconut was present in South Asia before the 1st century BC.
  • Botanically, the coconut is classified as a fruit – more specifically, it is a drupe. Drupes are more commonly called stone fruits.
  • In the movie Monty Python and the Holy Grail from 1975, Terry Jones, a Welsh actor and director, said they clapped two dried coconut shells together in rhythm to capture the sound of horses trotting on the pavement.
  • In 2011, Ho Eng Hui managed to pierce 4 coconuts in 12.15 seconds in Milan to set a world record.
  • People have actually used coconut fibers over the centuries to construct robust armor. This includes the natives of the Kiribati islands, who used woven coconut string to build their suits.
  • On average, three and a half cups of coconut equates to 1 tbsp (25 grams) of Fiber. This is the recommended daily amount of fiber an adult should have.
  • The slogan for Mounds, a U.S. coconut chocolate bar, was created during a contest of which the winner won a staggering $10.
  • Falling coconuts cause death, although only a small amount. 2.5% of injuries in Papua New Guinea Provincial Hospital were reported as caused by falling coconuts. A very small number of those killed the patient.
  • Carbon made from the coconut was used in the production of gas masks in WWI.
  • In Australia a specific species of octopus uses the shell for defense and shelter.
  • The residue fiber occurring from the production of coconut oil, is used as animal fodder.
  • Coconut water contains minerals which perfectly mimic that in the human body.
  • Coconut water has been used as a short-term substitute for human blood plasma.
  • The Tokelauans in the South Pacific, consume 60% of their daily calories from the coconut, and are in excellent health and show no signs of heart disease.
  • Sap from the unopened coconut flower can be made into “coconut vodka.”
  • The three “holes” in a coconut are actually germination pores for the new tree shoot.
  • In some countries trained monkeys are used to harvest coconuts.
  • Coconut husks can be burned as a mosquito repellant.
  • The fibrous husks can be made into mats, ropes, brushes and stuffing for mattresses.
  • Activated carbon obtained from burning coconut shells is effective for removing impurities.
  • Coconut oil was the world’s leading vegetable oil prior to the predominance of soybean oil, which has since proved less healthy.
  • The coconut tree contains both male and female flowers, but doesn’t self-pollinate.
  • The tree has an unusual shallow, fibrous root system that lacks a tap root and root hairs.
  • The trunk of a coconut tree is used in the construction of bridges, houses and boats.
  • In the 1970’s, General Marcos of the Philippines built a palace from coconut timber.
  • The coconut can be used as a flotation device.
  • Coconut oil contains medium-chain triglycerides (MTC) that are easily metabolized by humans.
  • In a study, men eating MTC ate 256 calories less per day on average.
  • Coconut oil has similar health benefits for dogs.
  • Coconut oil contains 3 healthy fatty acids–caprylic acid, lauric acid and capric acid.
  • Coconut water can be fermented into coconut vinegar.
  • The fairground pastime of coconut shy, a game consisting of stacked coconuts and balls to knock them down, has photographic evidence of it being played as early as 1890.
  • Researchers are investigating whether coconut husks can be used as a low cost solution to building material in the Philippines.
  • Coconut oil has swept the beauty world with so many celebrities and iconic figures swearing by it including Eva Mendes and Priyanka Chopra.
  • Sinbad the Sailor sold coconuts on his fifth voyage, as told in tale of the Arabian Nights.
  • In Asian and Pacific Ocean cultures the coconut figures in creation stories and myths.
  • The coconut tree could not be grown away from the shore without human beings transporting it.
  • Outside of India, ancient coconut fossils have been found in Australia and Columbia.
  • It is thought the coconut fruit can travel up to 100 days on the ocean’s tide and still germinate.
  • There are over 100 species of coconut trees, including dwarf varieties.
  • Coconut used to be spelled “cocoanut.”
  • The name coconut is actually a combination of nut, and the Portuguese word coco, after the face-like image the shell has with the 3 holes.
  • Coconut grenades were a weapon used in World War II by the Japanese in which a coconut was filled with items most importantly a grenade, and then thrown at the enemy.
  • In April 2007 the largest coconut ensemble was held with 5,877 people in London. They played it to the Monty Python hit “Always Look on the Bright Side of Life“.
  • The coconut tree is botanically named Cocus Nucifera and they can grow up to 82 feet (25 meters) high.
  • In 2013 police in the Maldives took possession of a coconut due to a belief that it had been cursed with black magic.
  • Just like mangoes, cashews and cherries, the coconut is actually a drupe and not a nut. The drupe is an item that has a fleshy outer around a pit.
  • During World War 2, coconut water was said to be used to treat dehydration due to short medical supplies.
  • The largest producers of coconuts are Indonesia, Philippines and India.
  • In a U.K. poll, Bounty a chocolate & coconut bar – seemingly disliked by many – was actually voted as one of Britain’s top 3 favorite candy bars.
  • In the Maldives the coconut is in the nation’s coat of arms, and is the national tree.
  • In India, the coconut is used in religious ceremonies and is prominent in the Hindu religion.
  • Growth hormones found in the coconut are used in the science of tissue culture.
  • Coconut oil extracted from the fruit can be manufactured into petroleum diesel fuel.
  • The song, “Coconut,” by singer-songwriter Harry Nilsson, was #66 in 1972 Billboard.
  • Half coconut shells can be struck together to imitate the sound of horse’s hoofbeats.
  • Based on FAOSTAT data, Indonesia produced over 29% of the world’s coconut supply in 2018.
  • Coconut oil isn’t just used in cooking, it’s also used in cosmetics, soaps, oils and other products.
  • The coir, which is the fiber husk around a coconut, is used to make brushes, mats, ropes and other items.
  • In Malaysia and Thailand there are trained southern pig-tailed macaques that can pick coconuts. In Thailand, the practice of training southern pig-tailed macaques to pick coconuts is about 400 years old.
  • A common coconut myth is more people are killed annually from falling coconuts than by shark attacks. There are documented cases of falling coconuts killing a human, but annual deaths by shark attacks are greater.
  • In April 2007 the largest coconut ensemble was held with 5,877 people in London. They played it to the Monty Python hit ‘Always Look on the Bright Side of Life’.
  • Coconuts, in different forms, are anti-viral, anti-fungal, anti-bacterial, and anti-parasite.
  • On average, three and a half cups of coconut equals to 1 tbsp. (25 grams) of fibre. This is the recommended daily amount of fibre an adult should have.
  • The coconut palm is the national tree of the Maldives.
  • In 2013 police in the Maldives took possession of coconut due to a belief that it had been cursed with black magic!
  • Coconut oil was the world’s leading vegetable oil until soybean oil took over in the 1960s.
  • Coconut oil contains MCTs, medium-chain triglycerides which are easy to digest. The oil is a source of energy and has an accelerating effect on the metabolism. Coconut oil is very healthy and good for your heart.
  • Coconut oil has swept the beauty world with so many celebrities and iconic figures swearing by it including Eva Mendes and Priyanka Chopra.
  • People have used coconut fibres over the centuries to construct robust armour. This includes the natives of the Kiribati islands, who used woven coconut string to build their suits.
  • During the Pacific War of 1941-45, coconut water was used to give emergency plasma transfusions to wounded soldiers.
  • The husk of coconut can be burnt to act as a natural mosquito repellent, a process used in many countries around the world.
  • Artists from around the world have turned coconuts into canvases. They use dried coconuts and carve them creating unique art pieces.
  • Coconut trees are one of the only plants that can produce enough oil to meet the needs of an alternative biofuel.
  • There is absolutely no other scent in the world that can transport you to the tropics like coconut. This is partly because many suntan lotions use the scent, so the smell of coconut triggers images of sun, sand, and sea even for people who have never been to the tropics.
  • Coconut oil also contains four growth hormones, called cytokinins, and three sets of chromosomes that help the development of many organisms.  Coconut water is considered the ‘father of modern tissue culture science’. Currently, research is being done to see if coconut can be used in hair regrowth and anti-aging cosmetics.
  • The coconut bra, famous for being a feature of the Hawaiian hula girl, is not native to Hawaii. The garment is a western idea that is not an authentic Hawaiian item.
  • The former president of the Philippines, Ferdinand Marcos, commissioned a coconut palace to be built in preparation for the Pope’s visit in 1981. 70% of the palace was constructed from coconut lumber. Coconut trees are incorporated into the architecture and design as well.
  • The coconut bra, famous for being a feature of the Hawaiian hula girl, is actually not native to Hawaii. The garment is a western idea that is not an authentic Hawaiian item.
  • The husk of a coconut can actually be burnt to act as a natural mosquito repellent, a process used in many countries around the world.
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